Free MT4 Indicators For Trading Binary Options - PART 1 ...

What's new in macOS 11, Big Sur!

It's that time of year again, and we've got a new version of macOS on our hands! This year we've finally jumped off the 10.xx naming scheme and now going to 11! And with that, a lot has changed under the hood in macOS.
As with previous years, we'll be going over what's changed in macOS and what you should be aware of as a macOS and Hackintosh enthusiast.

Has Nvidia Support finally arrived?

Sadly every year I have to answer the obligatory question, no there is no new Nvidia support. Currently Nvidia's Kepler line is the only natively supported gen.
However macOS 11 makes some interesting changes to the boot process, specifically moving GPU drivers into stage 2 of booting. Why this is relevant is due to Apple's initial reason for killing off Web Drivers: Secure boot. What I mean is that secure boot cannot work with Nvidia's Web Drivers due to how early Nvidia's drivers have to initialize at, and thus Apple refused to sign the binaries. With Big Sur, there could be 3rd party GPUs however the chances are still super slim but slightly higher than with 10.14 and 10.15.

What has changed on the surface

A whole new iOS-like UI

Love it or hate it, we've got a new UI more reminiscent of iOS 14 with hints of skeuomorphism(A somewhat subtle call back to previous mac UIs which have neat details in the icons)
You can check out Apple's site to get a better idea:

macOS Snapshotting

A feature initially baked into APFS back in 2017 with the release of macOS 10.13, High Sierra, now macOS's main System volume has become both read-only and snapshotted. What this means is:
However there are a few things to note with this new enforcement of snapshotting:

What has changed under the hood

Quite a few things actually! Both in good and bad ways unfortunately.

New Kernel Cache system: KernelCollections!

So for the past 15 years, macOS has been using the Prelinked Kernel as a form of Kernel and Kext caching. And with macOS Big Sur's new Read-only, snapshot based system volume, a new version of caching has be developed: KernelCollections!
How this differs to previous OSes:

Secure Boot Changes

With regards to Secure Boot, now all officially supported Macs will also now support some form of Secure Boot even if there's no T2 present. This is now done in 2 stages:
While technically these security features are optional and can be disabled after installation, many features including OS updates will no longer work reliably once disabled. This is due to the heavy reliance of snapshots for OS updates, as mentioned above and so we highly encourage all users to ensure at minimum SecureBootModel is set to Default or higher.

No more symbols required

This point is the most important part, as this is what we use for kext injection in OpenCore. Currently Apple has left symbols in place seemingly for debugging purposes however this is a bit worrying as Apple could outright remove symbols in later versions of macOS. But for Big Sur's cycle, we'll be good on that end however we'll be keeping an eye on future releases of macOS.

New Kernel Requirements

With this update, the AvoidRuntimeDefrag Booter quirk in OpenCore broke. Because of this, the macOS kernel will fall flat when trying to boot. Reason for this is due to cpu_count_enabled_logical_processors requiring the MADT (APIC) table, and so OpenCore will now ensure this table is made accessible to the kernel. Users will however need a build of OpenCore 0.6.0 with commit bb12f5f or newer to resolve this issue.
Additionally, both Kernel Allocation requirements and Secure Boot have also broken with Big Sur due to the new caching system discussed above. Thankfully these have also been resolved in OpenCore 0.6.3.
To check your OpenCore version, run the following in terminal:
nvram 4D1FDA02-38C7-4A6A-9CC6-4BCCA8B30102:opencore-version
If you're not up-to-date and running OpenCore 0.6.3+, see here on how to upgrade OpenCore: Updating OpenCore, Kexts and macOS

Broken Kexts in Big Sur

Unfortunately with the aforementioned KernelCollections, some kexts have unfortunately broken or have been hindered in some way. The main kexts that currently have issues are anything relying on Lilu's userspace patching functionality:
Thankfully most important kexts rely on kernelspace patcher which is now in fact working again.

MSI Navi installer Bug Resolved

For those receiving boot failures in the installer due to having an MSI Navi GPU installed, macOS Big Sur has finally resolved this issue!

New AMD OS X Kernel Patches

For those running on AMD-Based CPUs, you'll want to also update your kernel patches as well since patches have been rewritten for macOS Big Sur support:

Other notable Hackintosh issues

Several SMBIOS have been dropped

Big Sur dropped a few Ivy Bridge and Haswell based SMBIOS from macOS, so see below that yours wasn't dropped:
If your SMBIOS was supported in Catalina and isn't included above, you're good to go! We also have a more in-depth page here: Choosing the right SMBIOS
For those wanting a simple translation for their Ivy and Haswell Machines:

Dropped hardware

Currently only certain hardware has been officially dropped:

Extra long install process

Due to the new snapshot-based OS, installation now takes some extra time with sealing. If you get stuck at Forcing CS_RUNTIME for entitlement, do not shutdown. This will corrupt your install and break the sealing process, so please be patient.

X79 and X99 Boot issues

With Big Sur, IOPCIFamily went through a decent rewriting causing many X79 and X99 boards to fail to boot as well as panic on IOPCIFamily. To resolve this issue, you'll need to disable the unused uncore bridge:
You can also find prebuilts here for those who do not wish to compile the file themselves:

New RTC requirements

With macOS Big Sur, AppleRTC has become much more picky on making sure your OEM correctly mapped the RTC regions in your ACPI tables. This is mainly relevant on Intel's HEDT series boards, I documented how to patch said RTC regions in OpenCorePkg:
For those having boot issues on X99 and X299, this section is super important; you'll likely get stuck at PCI Configuration Begin. You can also find prebuilts here for those who do not wish to compile the file themselves:

SATA Issues

For some reason, Apple removed the AppleIntelPchSeriesAHCI class from AppleAHCIPort.kext. Due to the outright removal of the class, trying to spoof to another ID (generally done by SATA-unsupported.kext) can fail for many and create instability for others. * A partial fix is to block Big Sur's AppleAHCIPort.kext and inject Catalina's version with any conflicting symbols being patched. You can find a sample kext here: Catalina's patched AppleAHCIPort.kext * This will work in both Catalina and Big Sur so you can remove SATA-unsupported if you want. However we recommend setting the MinKernel value to 20.0.0 to avoid any potential issues.

Legacy GPU Patches currently unavailable

Due to major changes in many frameworks around GPUs, those using ASentientBot's legacy GPU patches are currently out of luck. We either recommend users with these older GPUs stay on Catalina until further developments arise or buy an officially supported GPU

What’s new in the Hackintosh scene?

Dortania: a new organization has appeared

As many of you have probably noticed, a new organization focusing on documenting the hackintoshing process has appeared. Originally under my alias, Khronokernel, I started to transition my guides over to this new family as a way to concentrate the vast amount of information around Hackintoshes to both ease users and give a single trusted source for information.
We work quite closely with the community and developers to ensure information's correct, up-to-date and of the best standards. While not perfect in every way, we hope to be the go-to resource for reliable Hackintosh information.
And for the times our information is either outdated, missing context or generally needs improving, we have our bug tracker to allow the community to more easily bring attention to issues and speak directly with the authors:

Dortania's Build Repo

For those who either want to run the lastest builds of a kext or need an easy way to test old builds of something, Dortania's Build Repo is for you!
Kexts here are built right after commit, and currently supports most of Acidanthera's kexts and some 3rd party devs as well. If you'd like to add support for more kexts, feel free to PR: Build Repo source

True legacy macOS Support!

As of OpenCore's latest versioning, 0.6.2, you can now boot every version of x86-based builds of OS X/macOS! A huge achievement on @Goldfish64's part, we now support every major version of kernel cache both 32 and 64-bit wise. This means machines like Yonah and newer should work great with OpenCore and you can even relive the old days of OS X like OS X 10.4!
And Dortania guides have been updated accordingly to accommodate for builds of those eras, we hope you get as much enjoyment going back as we did working on this project!

Intel Wireless: More native than ever!

Another amazing step forward in the Hackintosh community, near-native Intel Wifi support! Thanks to the endless work on many contributors of the OpenIntelWireless project, we can now use Apple's built-in IO80211 framework to have near identical support to those of Broadcom wireless cards including features like network access in recovery and control center support.
For more info on the developments, please see the itlwm project on GitHub: itlwm

Clover's revival? A frankestien of a bootloader

As many in the community have seen, a new bootloader popped up back in April of 2019 called OpenCore. This bootloader was made by the same people behind projects such as Lilu, WhateverGreen, AppleALC and many other extremely important utilities for both the Mac and Hackintosh community. OpenCore's design had been properly thought out with security auditing and proper road mapping laid down, it was clear that this was to be the next stage of hackintoshing for the years we have left with x86.
And now lets bring this back to the old crowd favorite, Clover. Clover has been having a rough time of recent both with the community and stability wise, with many devs jumping ship to OpenCore and Clover's stability breaking more and more with C++ rewrites, it was clear Clover was on its last legs. Interestingly enough, the community didn't want Clover to die, similarly to how Chameleon lived on through Enoch. And thus, we now have the Clover OpenCore integration project(Now merged into Master with r5123+).
The goal is to combine OpenCore into Clover allowing the project to live a bit longer, as Clover's current state can no longer boot macOS Big Sur or older versions of OS X such as 10.6. As of writing, this project seems to be a bit confusing as there seems to be little reason to actually support Clover. Many of Clover's properties have feature-parity in OpenCore and trying to combine both C++ and C ruins many of the features and benefits either languages provide. The main feature OpenCore does not support is macOS-only ACPI injection, however the reasoning is covered here: Does OpenCore always inject SMBIOS and ACPI data into other OSes?

Death of x86 and the future of Hackintoshing

With macOS Big Sur, a big turning point is about to happen with Apple and their Macs. As we know it, Apple will be shifting to in-house designed Apple Silicon Macs(Really just ARM) and thus x86 machines will slowly be phased out of their lineup within 2 years.
What does this mean for both x86 based Macs and Hackintoshing in general? Well we can expect about 5 years of proper OS support for the iMac20,x series which released earlier this year with an extra 2 years of security updates. After this, Apple will most likely stop shipping x86 builds of macOS and hackintoshing as we know it will have passed away.
For those still in denial and hope something like ARM Hackintoshes will arrive, please consider the following:
So while we may be heart broken the journey is coming to a stop in the somewhat near future, hackintoshing will still be a time piece in Apple's history. So enjoy it now while we still can, and we here at Dortania will still continue supporting the community with our guides till the very end!

Getting ready for macOS 11, Big Sur

This will be your short run down if you skipped the above:
For the last 2, see here on how to update: Updating OpenCore, Kexts and macOS
In regards to downloading Big Sur, currently gibMacOS in macOS or Apple's own software updater are the most reliable methods for grabbing the installer. Windows and Linux support is still unknown so please stand by as we continue to look into this situation, macrecovery.py may be more reliable if you require the recovery package.
And as with every year, the first few weeks to months of a new OS release are painful in the community. We highly advise users to stay away from Big Sur for first time installers. The reason is that we cannot determine whether issues are Apple related or with your specific machine, so it's best to install and debug a machine on a known working OS before testing out the new and shiny.
For more in-depth troubleshooting with Big Sur, see here: OpenCore and macOS 11: Big Sur
submitted by dracoflar to hackintosh [link] [comments]

[Review] Ranking all the Switch shmups Ep26 – Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade

We’ve all had a game that is a gateway to a specific genre. That one game which made us pay attention to a style of games and allowed us to fully experience the genre. It might not have been the first one we play, but it is definitely one that stays closer to our hearts. For me, this game was Darius.
I’ve mentioned this in the past, but I will say it again: Darius is the shmup that is closest to my heart. I loved the horizontal gameplay, I loved the Silver Hawk, I loved all the huge bosses that looked like fishes. The gameplay also hit bunch of chords that resonate with what I love about shmups. I’ve been waiting so long for this, so alas, I present to you: Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade!
Publisher: ININ Games
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release date: Jun 16, 2020
Price: $44.99
Tate: Built-in
Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade is a collection of the Darius games released on the arcades. This wasn’t your typical cabinet, as one of its main features was the usage of multiple screens. Darius used 3 screens, while Darius II/SAGAIA used 2 screens. M2 really went out of their way to bring the most authentic arcade experience! The result is impressive to say the least!
This collections includes 4 games:
Darius and SAGAIA include 3 and 2 different versions respectively, bringing it to a total of 7 playable games.

ARCADE GLORY

As hard as this might be to believe, I have never played an arcade Darius game before. I always mentioned Darius as my favorite shmup, but the truth is that I began with the SNES games. I had heard on the street that the arcade versions were superior so I was very excited.
When I booted the original version, I couldn’t help but feel like I was standing next to an actual arcade cabinet. The game greeted me with 3 screens places next to each other on the center of the screen. I was excited to play, so I pressed the coin button. I was not prepared for what I was about to experience…
As soon as I inserted the coin, a typical fanfare played along as my credit counter increased by one. But there was something else. The controller started vibrating to the tune of the music. I just can’t make justice to this effect with words. It felt like being inside an actual arcade cabinet. Vibrations and sound made the experience feel authentic. It made me think about the arcade days where you would hear cabinets everywhere and just feel the energy of the place.
As soon as I started to play, the screen changed and the empty spaces were replaced by arcade artwork. This artwork was exactly the kind you would see pasted near the controllers to show you how to play and other general information. Everything about the game was designed to make you feel like on the arcade. This is the kind of presentation that every other arcade port should try to achieve.

FISH GRAVY

What truly sets apart the Darius Cozmic Collection from any other collection is the amount of features and arcade fidelity that M2 added to the game. Every single aspect, every single menu and every single feature was lovingly added to create a masterpiece.
From the get go, you will be presented with the very familiar “A boss is approaching” message featuring King Fossil. The message just says that your game data is approaching fast. It really is only a fancy way of saying the game is loading, but it sets the tone to the orgasmic experience that you are about to have with the game.
After going through the intro scene, you will be greeted with the main menu which contains all 7 playable titles in this collection. You also have a replay, manual and staff options. If you are wondering where the options are, they are specific for each game, so they must be adjusted from within each game. My only complaint here is that the manual is in japanese. There isn’t much to learn from a manual though. The only thing was the Darius Gaiden capture mechanic, so I picked that one up from the internet.

AN ENTIRE LEGACY

Speaking of the games, 7 different titles can be quite intimidating. If you are anything like me, then chances are you don’t know what’s “new ver” or “extra ver”. Thankfully, each game features a sort of museum display that features a screenshot of the menu, the title, the launch date and a very thorough description of the game. The text will navigate you through each version of the games and specifically highlight why it is different from its predecessor or what was changed when going to western markets.
Each game includes a training mode for those who wish to challenge specific parts of the game. Training mode will let you choose to play any stage and customize a variety of settings such as the strength of your Silver Hawk and the game rank, which is the in-game difficulty. The obvious use for this mode is to practice your piloting skills and go for the 1CC. Even casual players can view this as a pseudo level select cheat code for maximum enjoyment!
Perhaps one of the most amazing inclusions of the collection is the replay mode. For every one of your play throughs, there is an option to save a replay of your play session. What differs from regular replays, is that they pack an incredibly robust set of features. Other than being able to watch a recording of yourself, you can see your inputs and control the playback of the replay. You can rewind, fast forward, go back, increase the speed or even go full slow-mo to analyze your gameplay.

KING OF THE ARCADE

Challenging oneself is one thing, but going after the world is the true spirit or arcade shmups. Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade features online rankings which are separated into 2 categories: “Arcade” and “All-mix”. Arcade is played with every setting on default and using only one credit. If you are playing and choose to spend an additional credit to continue, then your scoring is changed to “All-mix”. All-mix is a catch-all for every other style, from easy difficulty to hard or even static rank modes.
If you ever wondered what’s it like to play like the king of the leaderboards, then you’ll be glad to know you can download leaderboard replays! This allows you to watch the entire play throughs of top players, along with their inputs and the previously mentioned playback features of a replay. A must have for those willing to go for the record or even those curious about what it means to be a champion.

YOUR PERFECT CABINET

The in-game menu for each game will further let you customize your gameplay experience. The amount of options is truly staggering, so suffice to know that you can change in-game setting as difficulty and score for an extend, screen quality adjustments like scan lines and gadgets, and the controllers.
One menu I really want to highlight is the gadgets menu. Gadgets are responsible for making the gameplay experience truly stand out. They track all sorts of data from yourself and the enemies. From a friendly side, you can see your current level of power, the number of hits your arm can take and the information related to the current zone. From a less friendly side, you have all sorts of analyzers that display the current boss, their weakness and detailed HP for each of their parts. There’s even a life gauge that appears at the bottom of the screen for easy viewing when fighting bosses!
Although I could see an argument against being way too much information, I’m personally thankful because I’m a data nerd and I love knowing all this information. If it is too much for you, then you can always turn off the gadgets and customize the screen to your liking. The real beauty comes from creating your perfect cabinet.

THE EMULATOR ADVANTAGE

One of the main selling points of emulators has been the ability to use save states. Darius Cozmic Collection is no slouch and features save states of its own! These save states will let you cheese the game as much as you want, but they also let you replay specific sections and master them for your future arcade runs. I won’t judge you, so have fun with save states! The only caveat is that using save states will not record your score. Unfortunately, replays will only record from the last time you loaded the save state onwards. So there’s no chance of creating tool-assisted runs.
Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that bringing up the in-game menu will completely pause the game and show you a fully-fledged map of the game, complete with boss encounters for each zone and the amount of power-ups featured in said zone. It really is great for strategy purposes to know which stage will allow you to upgrade your Silver Hawk! Resuming a game will also give you a 3 second count down with a jumping robot animation to ensure you are ready for action. This detail wasn’t really needed, but it is one of the many ways in which M2 shows appreciation for Darius and the player.
Out of all this nitty gritty details, I have to say the song name is one of my favorites. In the bottom right corner of the screen there is a pop-up that appears when the song changes and displays the song name. I just think it looks really cool. By the way, don’t forget to check “Olga Breeze”, my favorite song!

DARIUS, THE OG

Darius, the game that started it all. Featuring 3 screens, this is the biggest Darius game featured in this collection (ha!). If I may add, I also think this is the game that highlights all the love M2 poured into bringing arcade experiences to your living room. With features such as the cabinet art and the body sonic vibration, it really brings home the arcade feeling.
As you can expect, playing the first game on the series is both, a nostalgic and a painful experience. Playing on 3 screens is truly magical, but at the same time, it is a victim to the older design choices. Not much that can be done here, after all, it is a decades old game. Just a small detail to keep in mind.
Darius helps establish the foundations of the franchise from the very first game. One of the Darius staples is the upgrade system for the Silver Hawk. Throughout the game, you can encounter 3 different orbs which are dropped by different colored enemies. The orbs can be red, green or blue.

SILVER HAWK

Red orbs will upgrade your primary fire. Each orb increases your power, but collecting 7 will upgrade your shot to the laser, and then the wave. Green orbs will upgrade your bomb, which is your secondary fire. Bombs also get stronger with more orbs and also upgrade when you reach 7. Blue orbs will give you a shield called arm. The initial shield blocks 3 hits and any additional orb will add 1 more hit. Just like red and green, you can upgrade after 7 orbs which will make it so that additional orbs give you 2 hits and then 3.
The downside to the upgrade system is that, upon death, you will lose every orb you collected in your current tier. The good news is that if you, for instance, managed to upgrade to the laser, then your shot can never fall below that. The bad news is that the number of orbs is limited per stage, which means it is almost impossible to upgrade within a stage the same stage where you died. The exception is a single stage that has 7 blue orbs in the old version and one with 7 green in the extra version.

THE FISH

The most distinguishable characteristic of the franchise is definitely the marine bosses. The stages are all over the place with a very diverse space settings, but the bosses are always one thing: fish. Actually, I’d say it is marine biology, but fish is an overly simplistic way to describe it. Darius also has one peculiarity which is that every set of stages has the same boss. For example, the 4th stage boss will always be Fatty Glutton in a different version depending on which zone you chose.
The other defining feature of Darius is being able to choose your adventure. After each boss, you can choose to go to one of 2 different zones. This choice is made by either being on the top or bottom half of the screen, as the stage actually splits after beating the boss. It certainly took me off guard the first time as I crashed into the divider. Despite having the same boss, the zones are drastically different and carry the strategic choice of having a different number of orbs. Your path will be determined by which aspect of your Silver Hawk you want to improve.

THE COINS

What struck me the most about Darius is how unforgiving it is. This is expressed in the descriptions of the newer versions. The thing about Darius, is that the game is next to impossible to beat if you didn’t fully upgrade. Later enemies are merciless and if you don’t have sufficient firepower, then you probably won’t stand a chance. This ruthlessness is exacerbated by the death system, as death will set you considerably behind. Because upgrades are usually a 2-stage effort, getting shot will set you back 2 levels worth of progress.
A fun aspect I found on Darius is the dynamic created by having 3 screens. This is probably the widest game I have played, and it brings new challenges to the table. The first one is that you need to gain screen position to succeed. Being at the front is usually better, with moving back feeling like losing real estate. The reason behind this is that you are able to shoot down enemies before they become a threat with their numbers. The other less obvious reason is the number of bullets allowed on screen. That number is limited, so it is in your best interest that those bullets expire fast so you can fire new ones. Being back equals more time before they reach the end of the screen, which is undesirable.
Overall, the game poses a unique challenge, but I’m not going to lie, it is actually really fun to play. Achieving an upgraded Silver Hawk is a hard endeavor, but that makes it even more rewarding when you pull it off!

DARIUS II/SAGAIA, THE PROOF US WESTERNERS HAVE SHORT ATTENTION SPANS

Darius II came in and simplified the game in some interesting ways. First of all it reduced the upgrade system so that it is now only a single stage that can be maxed out. The number of orbs was reduced to compensate. Another simplification comes courtesy of the screens themselves. The number of screens was reduced from 3 to 2 in order to be installed in other dual screen cabinets such as The Ninja Warriors.
Unfortunately, the single stage of upgrades means that the game is even more savage when you die. This time around, you actually lose all of your progress in terms of firepower. There will be special rainbow orbs which help you catch up a little, but even then they might be a little too late. As a result, my 1CC had to be done by never dying.

I ALWAYS WANTED A THING CALLED A TUNA SASHIMI

One thing I want to mention, is that Darius II has my absolute favorite intro sequence of any Darius game in this collection. From the music that goes ramping up to the main theme, to the voice lines calling out the launching sequence:
“Main engine energy level, 20% increase !”
“I always wanted a thing called tuna sashimi”
“3…2…1…”
It all creates an unbelievable sense of excitement!
A very fun piece of trivia is the existence of SAGAIA. It exists to be a compact version of Darius II to be sold on western markets. Then there’s actually 2 versions of it which feel like 2 pieces of the same game. If SAGAIA trimmed certain pieces of the game, then version 2 came to use those trimmed pieces and created another entry. It’s actually quite funny.

DARIUS GAIDEN, THE KING

Darius Gaiden is definitely the reason you will keep playing the arcade collection. Quality in older games under a modern eye is usually a product of nostalgia and design elements that still hold on in today’s gaming landscape. Contrasting with that, Darius Gaiden IS a fantastic game that I wouldn’t hesitate to purchase if it was released today.
For Darius Gaiden, less is more, as this time around the game was played on a single screen arcade cabinet. The game does seem to lack some of the ambient goodies such as the rumble effects, but it makes up for it in gameplay experiences.

TRUE POWER

One aspect that is radically different from its predecessor is the upgrade system. Whereas Darius II simplified the Silver Hawk upgrade system, Darius Gaiden took it back to its original Darius roots. This means that, once again, we have multiple upgrade points. Upgrades take considerably less red power-ups to achieve, which actually makes it possible to upgrade multiple times during the same stage.
Death penalties are lower as well with death only losing you a level of power. Because there are more power levels, it is more forgiving and doesn’t set you completely behind like the previous entries. Perhaps the best of all is that neither arm nor bombs have any penalty whatsoever. What’s more, you don’t even lose your arm or bomb level when losing a credit. I can say with 100% certainty that this game is actually possible to complete within a reasonable number of credits if you die on the later zones.
I would take it one step ahead and say this game has a little of the Contra syndrome. The original Contra is a game that was considered hard, but was significantly easier if you could maintain the spread shot. In the same vein, getting the earliest upgrades makes Darius Gaiden a breeze. A well deserved victory, if you ask me.

YOU’RE MINE NOW!

New to Darius Gaiden is the ability to capture mid bosses. Half-way through a stage, you will encounter a medium sized boss with a purple orb somewhere in its back. If you manage to take down the orb without killing the enemy, it will detach and slowly drift away. If you capture this orb, then the mid boss will fight alongside you until its timer expires. I gotta say that having a huge fish on your side is surprisingly satisfying!
Having a single screen makes the experience much more familiar for shmup enthusiasts. While it does lose some of the charm of the ultra wide field of view, it also rids itself of nuances such as your horizontal movement being low in terms of total horizontal space or the limit on on-screen bullets.
A combination of those factors I mentioned contribute to making Darius Gaiden a much better experience. It’s simple to play and forgiving when you lose. Every stage is unique and makes every new play through a completely different experience, not just in a different-ish way, but rather full blown new content!

A LEGENDARY PACKAGE OF NOSTALGIA

There’s one thing that you might be thinking, and that’s that I might be biased because it is Darius. It is true that I openly admit everywhere that Darius is my favorite. However, in this particular case my work was cut out for me, I don’t need to be biased because this is truly a wonderfully crafted collection that deserves to be on everyone’s Switch.
It contains every possible version of Darius you might have encountered on the arcades and then sprinkled some top notch features that make it stand on a class of its own when it comes to ports. It also helps that the Darius games remain to be as fun as they always have been, even with their caveats. I took 3-4 times more time to play this collection, not because it had a lot of content, but because I loved playing every second of it and wanted to try it all. Wanted to 1CC every version, wanted to traverse every possible stage, wanted to created masterful replays.
The only possible downside I can see to this collection is the price. $44.99 is a very high price compared to other shmups on the market. In terms of features and overall content (because remember, every game has more than an alphabets worth of different zones) it does warrant its price. Although I can see people double guess their decision, with this game being close to the cost of a first party title and significantly higher than other shmups.

TOP 3

My tentative placement for Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade was on the top 3 spots. I really had a hard time deciding where to put it, so I went back and revisited both Ikaruga and Psyvariar Delta. After finishing my Ikaruga play through, I was reminded of the magic that is Ikaruga and how special it is. Psyvariar Delta also reminded me of the buzz system and how the refined gameplay and level ups work towards creating an experience that I can’t quite put into words.
The main defining factor, however, was that I don’t think any of the Darius games in the collection beats the top 2 contenders. The 7 games as an aggregate, are certainly a force to be reckoned with thanks to the superb M2 porting labour. With that being said, I will award it a 3rd spot because the gameplay experience is incredible, but a little held back by the age of the games and the hefty price tag.
Still, Darius will always be #1 in my heart.

THE RANKING SO FAR:

  1. Ikaruga
  2. Psyvariar Delta
  3. Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade
  4. Devil Engine
  5. Rolling Gunner
  6. Blazing Star
  7. Jamestown+
  8. Tengai
  9. Steredenn: Binary Stars
  10. Stardust Galaxy Warriors: Stellar Climax
  11. Sky Force: Reloaded
  12. Strikers 1945
  13. Black Paradox
  14. R-Type Dimensions EX
  15. Sine Mora EX
  16. Shikhondo – Soul Eater
  17. Ghost Blade HD
  18. AngerForce: Reloaded
  19. Aero Fighters 2 (ACA Neogeo)
  20. Q-YO Blaster
  21. Lightening Force: Quest for the darkstar (Sega Ages)
  22. Pawarumi
  23. Red Death
  24. Task Force Kampas
  25. Switch ‘N’ Shoot
  26. Last Resort (ACA Neogeo)
submitted by AzorMX to NintendoSwitch [link] [comments]

Hi r/shmups! I'm currently on a project where I try to review every shmup on the Switch, so I thought I'd share my reviews here! Here's the 26th entry: Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade

We’ve all had a game that is a gateway to a specific genre. That one game which made us pay attention to a style of games and allowed us to fully experience the genre. It might not have been the first one we play, but it is definitely one that stays closer to our hearts. For me, this game was Darius.
I’ve mentioned this in the past, but I will say it again: Darius is the shmup that is closest to my heart. I loved the horizontal gameplay, I loved the Silver Hawk, I loved all the huge bosses that looked like fishes. The gameplay also hit bunch of chords that resonate with what I love about shmups. I’ve been waiting so long for this, so alas, I present to you: Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade!
Publisher: ININ Games
Platform: Nintendo Switch
Release date: Jun 16, 2020
Price: $44.99
Tate: Built-in
Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade is a collection of the Darius games released on the arcades. This wasn’t your typical cabinet, as one of its main features was the usage of multiple screens. Darius used 3 screens, while Darius II/SAGAIA used 2 screens. M2 really went out of their way to bring the most authentic arcade experience! The result is impressive to say the least!
This collections includes 4 games:
Darius and SAGAIA include 3 and 2 different versions respectively, bringing it to a total of 7 playable games.
ARCADE GLORY
As hard as this might be to believe, I have never played an arcade Darius game before. I always mentioned Darius as my favorite shmup, but the truth is that I began with the SNES games. I had heard on the street that the arcade versions were superior so I was very excited.
When I booted the original version, I couldn’t help but feel like I was standing next to an actual arcade cabinet. The game greeted me with 3 screens places next to each other on the center of the screen. I was excited to play, so I pressed the coin button. I was not prepared for what I was about to experience…
As soon as I inserted the coin, a typical fanfare played along as my credit counter increased by one. But there was something else. The controller started vibrating to the tune of the music. I just can’t make justice to this effect with words. It felt like being inside an actual arcade cabinet. Vibrations and sound made the experience feel authentic. It made me think about the arcade days where you would hear cabinets everywhere and just feel the energy of the place.
As soon as I started to play, the screen changed and the empty spaces were replaced by arcade artwork. This artwork was exactly the kind you would see pasted near the controllers to show you how to play and other general information. Everything about the game was designed to make you feel like on the arcade. This is the kind of presentation that every other arcade port should try to achieve.
FISH GRAVY
What truly sets apart the Darius Cozmic Collection from any other collection is the amount of features and arcade fidelity that M2 added to the game. Every single aspect, every single menu and every single feature was lovingly added to create a masterpiece.
From the get go, you will be presented with the very familiar “A boss is approaching” message featuring King Fossil. The message just says that your game data is approaching fast. It really is only a fancy way of saying the game is loading, but it sets the tone to the orgasmic experience that you are about to have with the game.
After going through the intro scene, you will be greeted with the main menu which contains all 7 playable titles in this collection. You also have a replay, manual and staff options. If you are wondering where the options are, they are specific for each game, so they must be adjusted from within each game. My only complaint here is that the manual is in japanese. There isn’t much to learn from a manual though. The only thing was the Darius Gaiden capture mechanic, so I picked that one up from the internet.
AN ENTIRE LEGACY
Speaking of the games, 7 different titles can be quite intimidating. If you are anything like me, then chances are you don’t know what’s “new ver” or “extra ver”. Thankfully, each game features a sort of museum display that features a screenshot of the menu, the title, the launch date and a very thorough description of the game. The text will navigate you through each version of the games and specifically highlight why it is different from its predecessor or what was changed when going to western markets.
Each game includes a training mode for those who wish to challenge specific parts of the game. Training mode will let you choose to play any stage and customize a variety of settings such as the strength of your Silver Hawk and the game rank, which is the in-game difficulty. The obvious use for this mode is to practice your piloting skills and go for the 1CC. Even casual players can view this as a pseudo level select cheat code for maximum enjoyment!
Perhaps one of the most amazing inclusions of the collection is the replay mode. For every one of your play throughs, there is an option to save a replay of your play session. What differs from regular replays, is that they pack an incredibly robust set of features. Other than being able to watch a recording of yourself, you can see your inputs and control the playback of the replay. You can rewind, fast forward, go back, increase the speed or even go full slow-mo to analyze your gameplay.
KING OF THE ARCADE
Challenging oneself is one thing, but going after the world is the true spirit or arcade shmups. Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade features online rankings which are separated into 2 categories: “Arcade” and “All-mix”. Arcade is played with every setting on default and using only one credit. If you are playing and choose to spend an additional credit to continue, then your scoring is changed to “All-mix”. All-mix is a catch-all for every other style, from easy difficulty to hard or even static rank modes.
If you ever wondered what’s it like to play like the king of the leaderboards, then you’ll be glad to know you can download leaderboard replays! This allows you to watch the entire play throughs of top players, along with their inputs and the previously mentioned playback features of a replay. A must have for those willing to go for the record or even those curious about what it means to be a champion.
YOUR PERFECT CABINET
The in-game menu for each game will further let you customize your gameplay experience. The amount of options is truly staggering, so suffice to know that you can change in-game setting as difficulty and score for an extend, screen quality adjustments like scan lines and gadgets, and the controllers.
One menu I really want to highlight is the gadgets menu. Gadgets are responsible for making the gameplay experience truly stand out. They track all sorts of data from yourself and the enemies. From a friendly side, you can see your current level of power, the number of hits your arm can take and the information related to the current zone. From a less friendly side, you have all sorts of analyzers that display the current boss, their weakness and detailed HP for each of their parts. There’s even a life gauge that appears at the bottom of the screen for easy viewing when fighting bosses!
Although I could see an argument against being way too much information, I’m personally thankful because I’m a data nerd and I love knowing all this information. If it is too much for you, then you can always turn off the gadgets and customize the screen to your liking. The real beauty comes from creating your perfect cabinet.
THE EMULATOR ADVANTAGE
One of the main selling points of emulators has been the ability to use save states. Darius Cozmic Collection is no slouch and features save states of its own! These save states will let you cheese the game as much as you want, but they also let you replay specific sections and master them for your future arcade runs. I won’t judge you, so have fun with save states! The only caveat is that using save states will not record your score. Unfortunately, replays will only record from the last time you loaded the save state onwards. So there’s no chance of creating tool-assisted runs.
Oh yeah, I forgot to mention that bringing up the in-game menu will completely pause the game and show you a fully-fledged map of the game, complete with boss encounters for each zone and the amount of power-ups featured in said zone. It really is great for strategy purposes to know which stage will allow you to upgrade your Silver Hawk! Resuming a game will also give you a 3 second count down with a jumping robot animation to ensure you are ready for action. This detail wasn’t really needed, but it is one of the many ways in which M2 shows appreciation for Darius and the player.
Out of all this nitty gritty details, I have to say the song name is one of my favorites. In the bottom right corner of the screen there is a pop-up that appears when the song changes and displays the song name. I just think it looks really cool. By the way, don’t forget to check “Olga Breeze”, my favorite song!
DARIUS, THE OG
Darius, the game that started it all. Featuring 3 screens, this is the biggest Darius game featured in this collection (ha!). If I may add, I also think this is the game that highlights all the love M2 poured into bringing arcade experiences to your living room. With features such as the cabinet art and the body sonic vibration, it really brings home the arcade feeling.
As you can expect, playing the first game on the series is both, a nostalgic and a painful experience. Playing on 3 screens is truly magical, but at the same time, it is a victim to the older design choices. Not much that can be done here, after all, it is a decades old game. Just a small detail to keep in mind.
Darius helps establish the foundations of the franchise from the very first game. One of the Darius staples is the upgrade system for the Silver Hawk. Throughout the game, you can encounter 3 different orbs which are dropped by different colored enemies. The orbs can be red, green or blue.
SILVER HAWK
Red orbs will upgrade your primary fire. Each orb increases your power, but collecting 7 will upgrade your shot to the laser, and then the wave. Green orbs will upgrade your bomb, which is your secondary fire. Bombs also get stronger with more orbs and also upgrade when you reach 7. Blue orbs will give you a shield called arm. The initial shield blocks 3 hits and any additional orb will add 1 more hit. Just like red and green, you can upgrade after 7 orbs which will make it so that additional orbs give you 2 hits and then 3.
The downside to the upgrade system is that, upon death, you will lose every orb you collected in your current tier. The good news is that if you, for instance, managed to upgrade to the laser, then your shot can never fall below that. The bad news is that the number of orbs is limited per stage, which means it is almost impossible to upgrade within a stage the same stage where you died. The exception is a single stage that has 7 blue orbs in the old version and one with 7 green in the extra version.
THE FISH
The most distinguishable characteristic of the franchise is definitely the marine bosses. The stages are all over the place with a very diverse space settings, but the bosses are always one thing: fish. Actually, I’d say it is marine biology, but fish is an overly simplistic way to describe it. Darius also has one peculiarity which is that every set of stages has the same boss. For example, the 4th stage boss will always be Fatty Glutton in a different version depending on which zone you chose.
The other defining feature of Darius is being able to choose your adventure. After each boss, you can choose to go to one of 2 different zones. This choice is made by either being on the top or bottom half of the screen, as the stage actually splits after beating the boss. It certainly took me off guard the first time as I crashed into the divider. Despite having the same boss, the zones are drastically different and carry the strategic choice of having a different number of orbs. Your path will be determined by which aspect of your Silver Hawk you want to improve.
THE COINS
What struck me the most about Darius is how unforgiving it is. This is expressed in the descriptions of the newer versions. The thing about Darius, is that the game is next to impossible to beat if you didn’t fully upgrade. Later enemies are merciless and if you don’t have sufficient firepower, then you probably won’t stand a chance. This ruthlessness is exacerbated by the death system, as death will set you considerably behind. Because upgrades are usually a 2-stage effort, getting shot will set you back 2 levels worth of progress.
A fun aspect I found on Darius is the dynamic created by having 3 screens. This is probably the widest game I have played, and it brings new challenges to the table. The first one is that you need to gain screen position to succeed. Being at the front is usually better, with moving back feeling like losing real estate. The reason behind this is that you are able to shoot down enemies before they become a threat with their numbers. The other less obvious reason is the number of bullets allowed on screen. That number is limited, so it is in your best interest that those bullets expire fast so you can fire new ones. Being back equals more time before they reach the end of the screen, which is undesirable.
Overall, the game poses a unique challenge, but I’m not going to lie, it is actually really fun to play. Achieving an upgraded Silver Hawk is a hard endeavor, but that makes it even more rewarding when you pull it off!
DARIUS II/SAGAIA, THE PROOF US WESTERNERS HAVE SHORT ATTENTION SPANS
Darius II came in and simplified the game in some interesting ways. First of all it reduced the upgrade system so that it is now only a single stage that can be maxed out. The number of orbs was reduced to compensate. Another simplification comes courtesy of the screens themselves. The number of screens was reduced from 3 to 2 in order to be installed in other dual screen cabinets such as The Ninja Warriors.
Unfortunately, the single stage of upgrades means that the game is even more savage when you die. This time around, you actually lose all of your progress in terms of firepower. There will be special rainbow orbs which help you catch up a little, but even then they might be a little too late. As a result, my 1CC had to be done by never dying.
I ALWAYS WANTED A THING CALLED A TUNA SASHIMI
One thing I want to mention, is that Darius II has my absolute favorite intro sequence of any Darius game in this collection. From the music that goes ramping up to the main theme, to the voice lines calling out the launching sequence:
“Main engine energy level, 20% increase !”
“I always wanted a thing called tuna sashimi”
“3…2…1…”
It all creates an unbelievable sense of excitement!
A very fun piece of trivia is the existence of SAGAIA. It exists to be a compact version of Darius II to be sold on western markets. Then there’s actually 2 versions of it which feel like 2 pieces of the same game. If SAGAIA trimmed certain pieces of the game, then version 2 came to use those trimmed pieces and created another entry. It’s actually quite funny.
DARIUS GAIDEN, THE KING
Darius Gaiden is definitely the reason you will keep playing the arcade collection. Quality in older games under a modern eye is usually a product of nostalgia and design elements that still hold on in today’s gaming landscape. Contrasting with that, Darius Gaiden IS a fantastic game that I wouldn’t hesitate to purchase if it was released today.
For Darius Gaiden, less is more, as this time around the game was played on a single screen arcade cabinet. The game does seem to lack some of the ambient goodies such as the rumble effects, but it makes up for it in gameplay experiences.
TRUE POWER
One aspect that is radically different from its predecessor is the upgrade system. Whereas Darius II simplified the Silver Hawk upgrade system, Darius Gaiden took it back to its original Darius roots. This means that, once again, we have multiple upgrade points. Upgrades take considerably less red power-ups to achieve, which actually makes it possible to upgrade multiple times during the same stage.
Death penalties are lower as well with death only losing you a level of power. Because there are more power levels, it is more forgiving and doesn’t set you completely behind like the previous entries. Perhaps the best of all is that neither arm nor bombs have any penalty whatsoever. What’s more, you don’t even lose your arm or bomb level when losing a credit. I can say with 100% certainty that this game is actually possible to complete within a reasonable number of credits if you die on the later zones.
I would take it one step ahead and say this game has a little of the Contra syndrome. The original Contra is a game that was considered hard, but was significantly easier if you could maintain the spread shot. In the same vein, getting the earliest upgrades makes Darius Gaiden a breeze. A well deserved victory, if you ask me.
YOU’RE MINE NOW!
New to Darius Gaiden is the ability to capture mid bosses. Half-way through a stage, you will encounter a medium sized boss with a purple orb somewhere in its back. If you manage to take down the orb without killing the enemy, it will detach and slowly drift away. If you capture this orb, then the mid boss will fight alongside you until its timer expires. I gotta say that having a huge fish on your side is surprisingly satisfying!
Having a single screen makes the experience much more familiar for shmup enthusiasts. While it does lose some of the charm of the ultra wide field of view, it also rids itself of nuances such as your horizontal movement being low in terms of total horizontal space or the limit on on-screen bullets.
A combination of those factors I mentioned contribute to making Darius Gaiden a much better experience. It’s simple to play and forgiving when you lose. Every stage is unique and makes every new play through a completely different experience, not just in a different-ish way, but rather full blown new content!
A LEGENDARY PACKAGE OF NOSTALGIA
There’s one thing that you might be thinking, and that’s that I might be biased because it is Darius. It is true that I openly admit everywhere that Darius is my favorite. However, in this particular case my work was cut out for me, I don’t need to be biased because this is truly a wonderfully crafted collection that deserves to be on everyone’s Switch.
It contains every possible version of Darius you might have encountered on the arcades and then sprinkled some top notch features that make it stand on a class of its own when it comes to ports. It also helps that the Darius games remain to be as fun as they always have been, even with their caveats. I took 3-4 times more time to play this collection, not because it had a lot of content, but because I loved playing every second of it and wanted to try it all. Wanted to 1CC every version, wanted to traverse every possible stage, wanted to created masterful replays.
The only possible downside I can see to this collection is the price. $44.99 is a very high price compared to other shmups on the market. In terms of features and overall content (because remember, every game has more than an alphabets worth of different zones) it does warrant its price. Although I can see people double guess their decision, with this game being close to the cost of a first party title and significantly higher than other shmups.
TOP 3
My tentative placement for Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade was on the top 3 spots. I really had a hard time deciding where to put it, so I went back and revisited both Ikaruga and Psyvariar Delta. After finishing my Ikaruga play through, I was reminded of the magic that is Ikaruga and how special it is. Psyvariar Delta also reminded me of the buzz system and how the refined gameplay and level ups work towards creating an experience that I can’t quite put into words.
The main defining factor, however, was that I don’t think any of the Darius games in the collection beats the top 2 contenders. The 7 games as an aggregate, are certainly a force to be reckoned with thanks to the superb M2 porting labour. With that being said, I will award it a 3rd spot because the gameplay experience is incredible, but a little held back by the age of the games and the hefty price tag.
Still, Darius will always be #1 in my heart.
THE RANKING SO FAR:
  1. Ikaruga
  2. Psyvariar Delta
  3. Darius Cozmic Collection Arcade
  4. Devil Engine
  5. Rolling Gunner
  6. Blazing Star
  7. Jamestown+
  8. Tengai
  9. Steredenn: Binary Stars
  10. Stardust Galaxy Warriors: Stellar Climax
  11. Sky Force: Reloaded
  12. Strikers 1945
  13. Black Paradox
  14. R-Type Dimensions EX
  15. Sine Mora EX
  16. Shikhondo – Soul Eater
  17. Ghost Blade HD
  18. AngerForce: Reloaded
  19. Aero Fighters 2 (ACA Neogeo)
  20. Q-YO Blaster
  21. Lightening Force: Quest for the darkstar (Sega Ages)
  22. Pawarumi
  23. Red Death
  24. Task Force Kampas
  25. Switch ‘N’ Shoot
  26. Last Resort (ACA Neogeo)
submitted by AzorMX to shmups [link] [comments]

Guide: Install macOS 11 (Big Sur) Without Cloning VM

DISCLAIMER: This was tested on a Ryzen CPU. Whilst it is highly likely that this solution will work on Intel machines, expect that it might not work. Also please know that Big Sur is still in beta and is not properly supported yet. It is slow, buggy, and stuff does not work! Install at your own risk for testing purposes only! I am not responsible for loss of data or hardware problems caused by following this guide.
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Introduction
I had posted about my success with installing Big Sur without cloning a virtual machine earlier today. I thought it may be beneficial to create a guide for those wishing to install Big Sur who have been putting it off due to the complexity of the original method. Thanks to the wizards working on Opencore, the installer now boots and it is now possible to either upgrade to Big Sur or make a clean install. I am aiming the content of this guide to someone who might be new to Opencore, but has made an Opencore Hackintosh before. If you have any issues with your install, please consult the Opencore troubleshooting guide before asking me. I am happy to help with unique issues related to Big Sur.
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My Hardware
This method should be compatible with any "hackintoshable" device. If you do run into hardware compatibility issues however, here are my hardware specifications.
​CPU: Ryzen 5 1500x
Motherboard: Asus Prime B350 Plus
Graphics: ASUS OC Radeon RX 5500XT 8GB
BIOS Version: 5407
LAN: Realtek PCIe LAN (Essentially the one that works with RTL8111.kext)
Bluetooth/WiFi: N/A
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What you will need
The biggest thing you are going to need is either a real Mac or a Hackintosh running Catalina. In order to build Opencore and the required kernel extensions, you will need the latest version of Xcode which only runs on Catalina. With that out of the way, here is a list of everything else you need.
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Guide
So! Once you have either a real Mac or Hackintosh running Catalina, have all the necessary files and applications, and enough time, you are ready to go! If you have already opened your Xcode installation before then skip this part of the guide. Otherwise, read on!
  1. Open Xcode.
  2. Agree to the terms and conditions.
  3. Let Xcode finish installing components.
  4. Then you can quit Xcode, that's all you need to do inside it!
Now you will need to compile the latest source version of Opencore, your required kernel extensions, and drivers. To do this we will need to use Xcode's build tools or OCBuilder. For those who want to just build everything with Xcode in the terminal, see the next part of this section. I only recommend you do this if you know exactly what you are doing as you may run into issues building certain extensions, packages, etc. You will get less bloat from it, but it will be much harder to do. For those wanting to go the easy route and use OCBuilder, keep reading!
With OCBuilder
  1. Open OCBuilder (It will throw a security error so just go into System Preferences > Security and click 'Open Anyway')
  2. On the drop down box where it says "Select Version", make sure Debug is selected.
  3. Click on the checkbox 'With Kexts?' to include the latest common kernel extensions.
  4. Underneath that, click on the 'Choose...' button. Here you will choose a directory to save the finished build to.
  5. Once that is finished, click build! It will take some time, be patient. If it looks like it is locked up it likely isn't, just give it 15-25 minutes. NOTE: The first time you build with OCBuilder it will need to install programs like NASM. When it does, it will prompt you to enter your administrator's password in order to install.
  6. Once the build is completed, navigate to the directory in which OCBuilder saved your build to and take out the 'EFI' folder. Put it somewhere easy to get to like the desktop. This will be the 'EFI' folder you use while following the Opencore guide.
With Xcode (Manual Method)
  1. Firstly, you will need to clone the necessary git repositories. They are linked below...
    1. Opencore - https://github.com/acidanthera/OpenCorePkg
    2. OCBinaryData (Drivers) - https://github.com/acidanthera/OcBinaryData
    3. Kexts - Use Goldfish64's Kext Repo to download the latest extensions
  2. Create a directory that you wish to download the repository too.
  3. Open terminal and navigate to that directory. Type into the terminal git clone 'REPO_LINK _HERE' to download the repository.
  4. You don't need to build anything from OCBinaryData. Just open it and take out the drivers you need.
  5. Navigate to your Opencore download and run build_oc.tool.
  6. Once completed, Opencore will be built to the 'Binaries' directory. Extract the 'DEBUG' zip and take out the EFI folder. This is the EFI you will use to complete the Opencore guide.
    1. NOTE - Opencore may have complaints, when building, about not having programs like NASM installed. You will have to install these dependencies. The build tool should notify you of what those dependencies are.
  7. If you run into any issues with this and can't solve it, use OCBuilder or another application that does all of the necessary tasks for you.
Now you will need to complete the Opencore guide as you would normally do with a Hackintosh install. The method is essentially the same as Catalina, but AMD users have an exception as noted below.
Lastly for this section, you will need to make a decision. Either you will do a clean install or an upgrade. For an upgrade, keep reading. If you are wanting a clean install, keep scrolling until you find the 'CLEAN INSTALL' section. Upgrading is generally not recommended, but it did work for me. You will be taking your chances with an upgrade however.
UPGRADING
  1. Make sure you have already downloaded the Big Sur app as stated under the 'What you will need' section.
  2. Open MountEFI, or your EFI mounting method of choice, and mount the EFI partition of your drive with macOS installed.
  3. Open the EFI partition.
  4. BACKUP YOUR EFI FOLDER! If the EFI folder that you have just made does not work, you will need a way of getting back into the OS. I recommend creating a Catalina USB installer with your original EFI folder in the EFI partition just in case it doesn't work
  5. Once backed up, delete the old EFI folder out of the partition and paste in the new one you created before.
  6. Open up the 'Install Big Sur Beta' app you installed and follow the prompts to install.
  7. Once you have restarted, select the macOS Installer option in Opencore.
  8. The install will take 20-30 minutes.
  9. Your computer will likely restart just before the progress bar reaches the end. When it does, boot from your USB, and select the macOS Installer option in Opencore again. Once your verbose output stops at something like Forcing CS_RUNTIME for entitlement, wait and be patient. This process could take 20 minutes to a few hours! Once you restart, select the 'YOUR_DRIVE_NAME_HERE-Data' option and let it boot. Follow the on-screen prompts to get to the desktop.
  10. Congratulations, you have successfully installed macOS 11 Big Sur on your Hackintosh!
CLEAN INSTALL
  1. Firstly, you will need to create the macOS Big Sur bootable installer. To do this, get your 16gb USB drive and format it in Disk Utility with the following settings.
    1. Name: whatever you like it really doesn't matter
    2. Format: Mac OS Extended (Journaled)
    3. Scheme: GUID Partition Map
  2. FOR BETA 2: Next, open terminal and type in the following command sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Big\ Sur\ Beta.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/VOLUME_NAME_HERE
    1. FOR BETA 1: Next, open terminal and type in the following command sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Beta.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/VOLUME_NAME_HERE
  3. Let the createinstallmedia command do its magic. It might take a bit.
  4. Once that is done, open up MountEFI, or your EFI mounting method of choice, and mount the EFI partition of your USB.
  5. Open the EFI partition you just mounted and copy over the EFI folder you created before into it.
  6. Restart and boot from your USB.
  7. Select either the Install macOS Big Sur Beta, or the Install macOS Beta from the Opencore options, depending on if you created either a Beta 2 or Beta 1 USB.
  8. Install macOS as you would Catalina. Format the drive you will use to install macOS, and then install Big Sur through the on-screen prompts.
  9. It will say '3 minutes remaining for maybe 5-10 minutes', just be patient, it is working!
  10. Once your computer restarts, boot again to your USB and select the 'macOS Installer' option from the Opencore menu.
  11. The install will take roughly 30 minutes. It will likely restart just before the progress bar reaches the end.
  12. Once you restart, select the 'macOS Installer' option again from the Opencore menu. Once your verbose output stops at something like Forcing CS_RUNTIME for entitlement, wait and be patient. This process could take 20 minutes to a few hours! Once you restart, select the 'YOUR_DRIVE_NAME_HERE-Data' option and let it boot. Follow the on-screen prompts to get to the desktop.
  13. Congratulations, you have successfully installed macOS 11 Big Sur on your Hackintosh!
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Conclusion
Hopefully all of you had some success installing Big Sur. If you had success, leave a comment saying you did! I would love to know how it went. There are some amazing people who worked this extremely complex task. Make sure to give some thanks to IOIIIO on Github for the AMD kernel patches, InsanelyMac user Andrey1970 for the SMC fix, and of course the folks who grind to make Opencore compatible with the latest version of macOS. I am simply compiling this guide to make it easy for everyone to do this. Thank you everyone!
submitted by TheCrazyHoundDog to hackintosh [link] [comments]

Tutorial on “Flash TUYA RGBW Bulb with HAA firmware “ and make it “Works with HomeKit”

TL, DR; flashing TUYA devices with HAA firmware to make them appear in Home App as “Works with HomeKit”
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Flash TUYA RGBW Bulb with HAA
Few things at start
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• ⁠Home Accessory Architecture (HAA) is firmware from RavenSystem for ESP8266/8285 based smart devices (which are almost all). Link to github https://github.com/RavenSystem/esp-homekit-devices • ⁠concept : replace existing ESP based device firmware with HAA firmware (called flashing). • ⁠This makes the device directly compatible with Home App. No homebridge required. • ⁠usually HAA is in form of three files but tuya-convert requires a single file. We will see how to get that. • ⁠using Pi Zero WH with Raspbian Sretch Lite with usb keyboard (since pi zero w doesn’t have Ethernet port) • ⁠using MacBook Pro as laptop (you can use any other)
Steps
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Raspbian Stretch Lite install ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
• ⁠fresh install of raspbian stretch lite on a SD card using balenaEtcher. This is important for many dependencies required by tuya-convert. https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/ • ⁠create wpa_supplicant.conf and ssh flies in root of SD card • ⁠insert in Pi ZeroW...update and upgrade after boot
Tuya-Convert Install
••••••••••••••••••••••
• ⁠using usb keyboard attached to USB port and TV hooked to HDMI port of Pi • ⁠Type"git clone https://github.com/ct-Open-Source/tuya-convert" enter and wait. • ⁠Type "cd tuya-convert" • ⁠Type "./install_prereq.sh" and wait. • ⁠Download single HAA firmware file... https://github.com/maslyankov/haa-single-binary/raw/mastehaa-single.bin • ⁠copy it into “tuya-convert/files” folder. This is important otherwise you won’t get an option to flash HAA during the process and it will default to provided firmwares (tasmota, edpunra) • ⁠start the flash process...”./start_flash.sh” • ⁠connect to Access Point (WiFi) generated by Pi using an android device for simplicity (iOS device can work too) and join “vtrust-flash” • ⁠put tuya bulb in pairing mode (blinking continuously). Most tuya bulbs go into this after you rapidly turn on/off 4 times. But do check your device instruction • ⁠proceed with flash process by pressing enter. You should firmware being copied over and successfull flash message. • ⁠connect to Tuya bulb AP after it restarts to its AP...HAA-XXXX • ⁠join this WiFi and browse to http://device ip. • ⁠enter “bawoo bulb” json string from here.. https://github.com/RavenSystem/esp-homekit-devices/wiki/Devices-Database. • ⁠json string that works the best for RGBW (red green blue white - 4 channels) {"c":{"b":[{"g":0}]},"a":[{"t":30,"r":14,"g":12,"v":13,"w":4,"fr":4,"fg":4,"fv":4}] • ⁠configure your WiFi in the web page. Make sure to do it correctly. The bulb will restart after pressing SAVE and appear on your network with Device name as HAA-XXXX. Check with your router we page listing WLAN clients. • ⁠add to home app after restart by usual “add accessory->don’t have code... • ⁠insert code 021-82-017 • ⁠all done
submitted by Mazhar67 to homebridge [link] [comments]

List of New Supported Games and FAQ.

Hey guys! Here is a list of all the new supported games, you can download the Nucleus Co-Op scripts from the app now, the games listed here that are clickable link you to a guide but all are supported. You can also see all available scripts from the app now by pressing the view all option.
10 Miles to Safety
20XX
100% Orange Juice
200% Mixed Juice!
Abyssal Zone
Acceleration of SUGURI 2
Accel World VS. Sword Art Online Deluxe Edition
A Hat in Time
Air Missions: HIND
Alien Breed Impact
Alien Breed 2: Assault
Alien Breed 3: Descent
Aliens Colonial Marines
Aliens vs Predator
Alien Swarm: Reactive Drop
Among Us
Aragami: Shadow Edition
ARK: Survival Evolved
Ashen (steam version only)
Astroneer
Attack on Titan 2
ATV Drift & Tricks
Barony
Battle Grounds III
Binary Domain
BioShock 2
Bit Dungeon III
Blades of Time
Bladestorm: Nightmare
Blood and Bacon
Bob Was Hungry
Borderlands
Borderlands 2
Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel
Borderlands GOTY Enhanced
Borderlands 3
BrainBread 2
Broomstick League
Brütal Legend
Bulletstorm: Full Clip Edition
Bunch of Heroes
Call of Duty: Black Ops II
CastleMiner Z
Clandestine
Cladun Returns: This is Segoku
Chivalry: Medieval Warfare
Citadel: Forged With Fire
Code of Princess
Conan Exiles (16 june 2020 update added Funcom Live Services and now the game is online only effectively breaking the splitscreen script. You need to downgrade to the previous version.)
Contagion
Contra: Rogue Corps
Counter-Strike: Source
Craftopia
Cube World
Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online
Daemon X Machina
Damnation
Dark Souls: Prepare to Die Edition
Day of Defeat: Source
Day of Infamy
Deadfall Adventures
Dead Island
Dead Island: DE
Dead Island Riptide: DE
Dead Rising 2
Dead Rising 2: Off the Record
Dead Rising 3
Dead Rising 4
Deathtrap
Debris
Deep Rock Galactic
Desolate
Dinosaur Hunt
Divinity: Dragon Commander
Divinity: Original Sin Enhanced Edition
Divinity: Original Sin 2
Don't Starve Together
Door Kickers
Double Action: Boogaloo
Dragon Ball Xenoverse
Dragon Ball: Xenoverse 2
Dragon Marked for Death
Dragon Quest Builders 2
Drake Hollow
Dungeon of the Endless
Dungeons 3
Dungeon Siege III
Dying Light
Dystopia
Earth Defense Force 4.1
Earth Defense Force 5
Earth Defense Force: Insect Armageddon
Earth Defense Force: Iron Rain
Earthfall
Enemy Front
E.T. Armies
F1 2012
F1 2014
Fade to Silence
Factorio
Fallout 76
F.E.A.R. 3
Final Exam
Feel The Snow
Fight The Dragon
Fistful of Frags
Forge Quest
Fortified
Front Mission Evolved
Full Mojo Rampage
Garry's Mod
Gas Guzzlers Extreme
Generation Zero
Gensokyo Defenders
GOCCO OF WAR
God Eater Resurrection
God Eater 2 - Rage Burst
God Eater 3
God Mode
Golf It!
Grid 2
Grim Dawn
Ground Branch
GTFO
Guns n Zombies
Half-Life Deathmatch: Source
Half-Life 2: Deathmatch
Half-Minute Hero: The Second
Halo Custom Edition
Halo 2 LAN
Halo 2: Project Cartographer
Halo Online ElDewrito
Halo: The Master Chief Collection
Halo Wars: Definitive Edition
Hammerwatch
Hero Siege
Hoard
Hunted: The Demon’s Forge
Human: Fall Flat
I am Weapon: Revival
Insurgency
Iron Brigade
It came from space, and ate our brains
Kane & Lynch 2: Dog Days
KATANA KAMI: A Way of the Samurai Story
Killing Floor
Killing Floor 2
Killsquad
Kill to Collect
Lead and Gold: Gangs of the Wild West
Left 4 Dead 2
LEGO Worlds
Livelock
Lord of the Rings War in the North
Lost Planet 3
Magicite
McDroid
Mean Greens - Plastic Warfare
Mighty No. 9
Minecraft Java Edition
Monday Night Combat
Mordheim: City of the Damned
Morphies Law
Mothergunship
MudRunner
NanoWars
NASCAR '15 Victory Edition
Necropolis
Need For Speed Most Wanted 2005
Nioh: Complete Edition
Niffelheim
No Man's Sky
No More Room in Hell
Outbreak
Outbreak: TNN
Outland
Outward
Orcs Must Die! 2
ORION: Prelude
OVERKILL's The Walking Dead
Pacify
Paint the Town Red
PAYDAY: The Heist
PAYDAY 2
Pirates, Vikings, and Knights II
PixARK
PixelJunk Nom Nom Galaxy
Portal Knights
Prevent The Fall
Primal Carnage: Extinction
Project CARS 2
Pure
Raft
Rage
Re:Legend
Remnant: From the Ashes
Resident Evil 5
Resident Evil 6
Resident Evil Revelations
Re-Volt (RVGL)
RimWorld
Risk of Rain 2
Roguelands
Ryse: Son of Rome
Sacred 3
Saints Row The Third
Saints Row IV
Saints Row: Gat out of Hell
Sanctum
Sanctum 2
Scourge Outbreak
Secrets of Grindea
Senran Kagura: Shinovi Versus
Senran Kagura: Estival Versus
Senran Kagura: Peach Beach Splash
Serious Sam 2
Seven Days to Die
Sir, You Are Being Hunted
SkyDrift
Sniper Elite 3
Space Engineers
Space Hulk: Deathwing
Spec Ops: The Line
Spintires
Starbound
Stardew Valley
Star Wars: Battlefront 2 (Classic, 2005)
Strange Brigade
Strength of the Sword: ULTIMATE
Styx: Shards of Darkness
Super Mario 64
Super Mario 64 PC Port
Survivalist
Sven Coop
Sword Art Online Re: Hollow Fragment
Sword Art Online: Lost Song
Sword Art Online: Hollow Realization Deluxe Edition
Synergy
SYNTHETIK: Arena
SYNTHETIK: Legion Rising
Takedown: Red Sabre
Team Fortress 2
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows
Terraria
TerraTech
The Blackout Club
The Darkness 2
The Forest
The Haunted: Hells Reach
theHunter: Call of the Wild
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing II
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing III
The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing Final Cut
The Mean Greens - Plastic Warfare
The Simple Apocalypse
The Survivalists
The Watchers
Tokyo Ghoul:re Call to Exist
Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas 2
Tomb Raider
Torchlight II
Toukiden: Kiwami
Toukiden 2
TOXIKK
Unending Dusk
Unepic
Unloved
Unreal Tournament III
Umbrella Corps
Vagante
Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne
Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos
Warhammer 40,000: Space Marine
We Were Here Together
White Noise 2
World in Conflict: Complete Edition
Wreckfest
XCOM: Enemy Within
Zeno Clash II
Zombie Army Trilogy
Zombie Panic! Source

Frequently Asked Questions & Troubleshooting

(Under Construction, last updated: 11/08/20)
Q: What is Nucleus Co-Op?
A: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbituCgu3Bc
Nucleus Co-Op is a free and open source tool for Windows that allows split-screen play on many games that do not initially support it. The app was originally created by Lucas Assis. Zerofox later took over and added a ton of new features and improvements to support a lot more games. Ilyaki later joined in and brought multiple keyboards/mice support and more great features to the table. The app is currently being developed and updated by these devs: Lucas Assis, Zerofox and Ilyaki.
R-mach too for making and supporting the website that hosts the Nucleus Co-Op scripts.
Also the further development of the app wouldn't have been possible without all the amazing contributions and hard work from the SplitScreen Dreams Discord members (which include the devs mentioned above) that made all the new Nucleus Co-Op scripts and continue to make new discoveries and scripts to support even more games, among them: Talos91, PoundlandBacon, dr. old.boi, Pizzo and many more.
Q: How does Nucleus Co-Op work?
A: Essentially Nucleus Co-Op opens multiple instances of the same game (some games require mutex killing for that, among other methods) that will only answer to one specific gamepad (we do this via Nucleus Co-Op custom xinput dlls or xinput plus dlls) and connects those instances via LAN or steamworks online multiplayer emulation (Goldberg Emulator), all while making sure all the windows have focus so they can be playable with gamepads or that the instances are playable even in the background. Nucleus then resizes, removes borders and repositions the games windows so you can have synthetic splitscreen to play locally with your friends.
Q: Which games can be splitscreened using Nucleus Co-Op?
A: There are a lot of supported games, all mentioned in the list above. A ton of games are now supported thanks to the amazing program called Goldberg Emulator, developed by Mr. Goldberg, a big thank you to him. Read the Goldberg FAQ if you want to know more.
Q: Where do I download Nucleus Co-Op?
A: You can download latest version from Github. Download the compiled .rar release, don't download the source code zip if you just want to use the app. Zerofox's mod v0.9.9.9 r4 is the latest version recent scripts are created for, please avoid other versions for now.
Q: How do I use Nucleus Co-Op?
A: Here is a quick video tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWmvz59i-o0
1.- Download and exctract Nucleus Co-Op (extract using apps like 7-zip or winrar).
2.- Open NucleusCoop.exe.
3.- Click on Download Game Scripts, the script browser will open. Search for a game in the supported games list and download a script. You can also see all available scripts from the app now by pressing the view all option.
4.- Once the script has finished downloading you will get a prompt asking if you would like to add a game now, click yes if you want to add it now, if you select no proceed to step 6.
5.- Next you need to find where your game's executable is located. If you're not sure, try Googling 'where is (game) installed' and just search for the .exe in the place they tell you to look for. For Steam games this is usually something along the lines of 'C:\Program Files\Steam\steamapps\common(game)'. Some games will have their real .exe stashed away in a folder called 'bin' or 'binaries'. Once you choose the right .exe, add the game.
6.- You can also automatically add games, click 'Auto-Search' and select the drive and path you want to add games from.
7.- Once your game is added, select it in the Nucleus UI and drag the gamepad icons to the splitscreen layout, click on the top-left icon on the layout corner to change the type of splitscreen layout. You can also use multiple monitors, if you have multiple monitors connected they will show in the Nucleus UI. If you see Script Author's Notes appear at the bottom of the UI, read them carefully.
8.- Finally press > then Play (top right of the UI) and you are ready to go.
Q: Where should I place the Nucleus Co-Op folder?
A: You can place the folder wherever you like as long as you keep the following in mind:
DO NOT place it inside a folder containing files for a game you wish to play.
Avoid placing it inside a folder that has security settings applied to is, such as program files, program files (x86).
Some scripts require the Nucleus Co-Op folder to be located on the same drive as the game files.
If you are still unsure where to place the folder, the root of the drive your games are installed on is usually a safe option.
Q: How do I play with an uneven amount of players (such as 3 players) without having an empty space?
A: Right click on a section of the splitscreen layout.
Q: Nucleus Co-Op doesn't launch, how do I fix it?
A: Here are a few things you can try:
1.- Try updating your Microsoft.net framework, and install/reinstall Visual C++ 2010-2017.
2.- Make sure your antivirus program is not blocking Nucleus Co-Op or deleting any of its files.
3.- Run Nucleus Co-Op as admin.
4.- Restart your PC, and try again.
Q: Does Nucleus Co-Op have any malware?
A: Absolutely not.
Q: I wish to help out with the project, how can I get in touch?
A: Join the Nucleus Co-Op discord community or contact us here in the subreddit.
Q: When support for X game?
A: Not all games are easy to splitscreen, if you want to suggest a game make a post with the title [Request] Name of the game and provide useful information like if the game supports LAN or dedicated servers, if it is available on Steam or in other services, if it uses external servers for online, if it has gamepad support etc. Also you can contact any of our experienced Nucleus scripters here or in the Nucleus Co-Op discord and ask if a script is possible. The main scripter is the OP of this post for instance. Remember that Scripters are limited by the games they own and can test on, so if you really want support for a game to be added consider donating the game to the scripter in question.
Q: How do I know when a script gets updated?
A: Scripts updates are always announced in the Nucleus Co-Op discord server in the channel scripts updates.
Q: How do I create my own splitscreen script for Nucleus Co-Op?
A: Here is the documentation, open the .js file with notepad to read it. You can also use the other scripts you download from Nucleus as reference, they get downloaded to the Nucleus scripts folder. If you create a working script or if you have any questions about Nucleus scripting you can ask us in the Nucleus Co-Op discord or here in the subreddit, we can help you improve your script so it is fully working for sharing with the community.
Q: Does Nucleus Co-Op work on Linux/Mac?
A: Nucleus Co-Op depends on a lot of Windows functions and APIs, at the moment it only works on Windows 7 and Up. If you are interested in porting Nucleus Co-Op to other operating systems please feel free to contact any of the developers.
Q: Where can I report a bug/issue?
A: Note that Nucleus Co-Op is a tool in development and still in Alpha. Expect bugs, glitches and weird things to happen. Help other people not have these things happen by checking for a solution here and submitting a [BUG REPORT] to the reddit as a new topic or in the comments here, if no-one else has brought it up. Make sure you have read the script notes in the Nucleus UI very carefully first before submitting anything.
A good [BUG REPORT] looks like this:
Thread name: [BUG REPORT] Simon falling off horse
BUG: Simon falls off his horse.
EXPECTED: Simon should not fall off his horse, right?
CAUSE: I'm pretty sure it's because I have my computer plugged into an auto-blow.
STEPS TO REPRODUCE
1.- Open up Simon Stays On His Horse: The Interactive Video Game of the Movie.
2.- Choose Co-Op and join with another player.
3.- Simon falls off his horse!!!
TYPE: Severe! The gameplay can't continue if Simon isn't on his horse! (Alternatively, Minor if the gameplay can continue but it's just annoying)
NUCLEUS OPTIONS: I played with 2 players using the vertical splitscreen (left and right) on one tv and 2 famicom controllers. I'm using the latest version
SYSTEM: I'm on Windows 3.1 with 4MB of RAM, a 2KHz CPU and no graphics card, playing on a projector. She's a monster.
I'd really like this to get fixed please thanks magic man! -Beanboy"
Keep in mind most scripts are made and tested using the latest legit steam versions of a game, so provide information about what version of the game you have.
Also provide a debug log of the NucleusCoop error or crash, enable the debug log in Nucleus UI settings and save, the debug log will be created in Nucleus root folder where the .exe is. You can also ask for support in our discord.
Q: Why is Nucleus Co-Op resizing the game instances incorrectly/the instances look stretched?
A: Try setting your monitor scale to 100% in your monitoTV resolution settings. It is also highly recommended that you add custom resolutions to all your monitors from your AMD/Nvidia/Intel panel (For example if you are using a monitor resolution of 1920x1080 add custom resolutions like 960x540, 1920x540, 960x1080, ect.) that way most games will be able to see and use those custom resolutions and the splitscreen will not look stretched(Example). Note that not all games support custom or ultra widescreen resolutions. Also try disabling the Nucleus status window in Nucleus UI settings and save.
Q: Why is Nucleus Co-Op throwing an error message that it can not find a file when launching a script?
A: A lot of scripts edit the game's .ini or .cfg files to force windowed and to adjust the game's resolution to the window size, so make you sure you run your game at least once and change some graphic settings before running it via Nucleus Co-Op, that way you make sure the proper config files are getting generated first. If you are still getting the error after doing that, select the game in the UI, click on Game Options and select Delete UserProfile Config Path for all players. Also try disabling the Nucleus status window in Nucleus UI settings and save.
Q: Where are my Nucleus Co-Op save files located?
A: Some scripts save to the Nucleus Co-Op enviroment folder located in C:\Users\YourUser\NucleusCoop, you can access each game save file via the Nucleus Co-Op UI too, select a game, click on Game Options and select Open UserProfile Save/Config Path. Other scripts just save in the same file path your regular game saves to.
Q: Why are my in-game frames per second low/better in one instance than in the others when using Nucleus Co-Op?
A: Remember that Nucleus Co-Op opens multiple instances of a game, so depending on the game this can be quite demanding for your PC, to improve FPS and performance try reducing graphics settings like textures and shadows, limit the FPS or unfocus all the game windows so that they get equal priority and the FPS even out, you can do this by Alt-Tabbing to a different window like the Nucleus app window, the game windows will still remain on top, you can also press the windows key+b in your keyboard to unfocus all instances.
Q: My Playstation/generic PC controller isn't working/isn't being detected by Nucleus Co-Op, how do I fix it?
A: Most Nucleus Co-Op Scripts only detect Xinput gamepads. Controllers that work best are Xbox 360 game controllers for minimum hassle. There are a few scripts that also support Direct Input gamepads but Xinput gamepads are generally a lot easier to restrict to a specific game instance than Dinput gamepads.
If you are using PS4 gamepads try the app DS4windows, look in the settings for an option called "hide ds4 controller" - make sure it's ticked. To ensure it's definitely running in exclusive mode make sure ds4windows is set to load on windows startup, then turn your controllers on while windows is loading. Download the latest version here - https://ryochan7.github.io/ds4windows-site/
Read more about how to use exclusive mode here: https://github.com/Ryochan7/DS4Windows/wiki/Exclusive-Mode-(Hide-DS4-Controller-config-option)-tips-and-issues
If you are using generic dinput gamepads the app XOutput is also useful to emulate xinput gamepads.
The app X360CE version 4 that creates virtual Xbox 360 Controllers inside your Windows operating system is also very useful to emulate xinput gamepads system wide.
Remember that some games detect both dinput and xinput gamepads so even if you are emulating a xinput gamepad the input could still not be restricted correctly because the game is now responding to both the emulated xinput gamepad and to the native direct input of your gamepad, that is why some apps like DS4windows have an "exclusive mode".
Also do not place any x360ce xinput dlls inside the Nucleus Co-Op files as this might interfere with Nucleus custom xinput dlls.
Xbox One gamepads have some issues with background input in games that only support direct input gamepads and with Unity games that use Unity's default input for gamepad support.
If you are using steam controllers try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wy4F2eqTXQ4
Q: Why is my keyboard not showing in the Nucleus Co-Op UI?
A: If a script is only showing gamepads and not keyboard icons that means the script only supports gamepads and doesn't support keyboards and mice in splitscreen yet.
Q: There are many keyboards and mice icons in the UI, how do I know which ones to use?
A: If you press a key in the keyboard you will use or move the mouse their corresponding icons in the Nucleus Co-Op UI will light up yellow. The app can detect keyboard macros that is why sometimes you will get multiple keyboard icons.
Q: Can you play splitscreen+LAN in different PCs?
A: Yes, if you run the game via Nucleus Co-Op in different PCs you can connect all instances you launch via LAN, for example you can have 2 players playing vertical splitscreen in one PC via Nucleus and connect to 2 others playing Nucleus splitscreen in a different PC via LAN. If the script uses steamworks multiplayer emulation you'll have to change the instances steam ids in the other PCs you'll connect to, otherwise the instances launched by Nucleus will use the same steam ids and won't be able to connect to each other. For that you can open the game script .js file in Nucleus scripts folder in the other PCs and add for example Game.PlayerSteamIDs = [ "76561198134585131","76561198131394153","76561198011792067","76561198043762785" ]; that will change the default ids of the first four instances you open in one PC via Nucleus Co-Op.
Q: This project is Amazing where can I donate?
A: We don't have an unified donation platform yet but you can support the devs individually here: Zerofox, Ilyaki, Lucas Assis.
You can also donate to our main scripters that make the games scripts for Nucleus: Talos91/blackman9
submitted by blackman9 to nucleuscoop [link] [comments]

Step-by-Step Guide for Adding a Stack, Expanding Control Lines, and Building an Assembler

After the positive response to my first tutorial on expanding the RAM, I thought I'd continue the fun by expanding the capabilities of Ben's 8-bit CPU even further. That said, you'll need to have done the work in the previous post to be able to do this. You can get a sense for what we'll do in this Imgur gallery.
In this tutorial, we'll balance software and hardware improvements to make this a pretty capable machine:

Parts List

To only update the hardware, you'll need:
If you want to update the toolchain, you'll need:
  1. Arduino Mega 2560 (Amazon) to create the programmer.
  2. Ribbon Jumper Cables (Amazon) to connect the Arduino to the breadboard.
  3. TL866 II Plus EEPROM Programmer (Amazon) to program the ROM.
Bonus Clock Improvement: One additional thing I did is replace the 74LS04 inverter in Ben's clock circuit with a 74LS14 inverting Schmitt trigger (datasheet, Jameco). The pinouts are identical! Just drop it in, wire the existing lines, and then run the clock output through it twice (since it's inverting) to get a squeaky clean clock signal. Useful if you want to go even faster with the CPU.

Step 1: Program with an Arduino and Assembler (Image 1, Image 2)

There's a certain delight in the physical programming of a computer with switches. This is how Bill Gates and Paul Allen famously programmed the Altair 8800 and started Microsoft. But at some point, the hardware becomes limited by how effectively you can input the software. After upgrading the RAM, I quickly felt constrained by how long it took to program everything.
You can continue to program the computer physically if you want and even after upgrading that option is still available, so this step is optional. There's probably many ways to approach the programming, but this way felt simple and in the spirit of the build. We'll use an Arduino Mega 2560, like the one in Ben's 6502 build, to program the RAM. We'll start with a homemade assembler then switch to something more robust.
Preparing the Physical Interface
The first thing to do is prepare the CPU to be programmed by the Arduino. We already did the hard work on this in the RAM upgrade tutorial by using the bus to write to the RAM and disconnecting the control ROM while in program mode. Now we just need to route the appropriate lines to a convenient spot on the board to plug the Arduino into.
  1. This is optional, but I rewired all the DIP switches to have ground on one side, rather than alternating sides like Ben's build. This just makes it easier to route wires.
  2. Wire the 8 address lines from the DIP switch, connecting the side opposite to ground (the one going to the chips) to a convenient point on the board. I put them on the far left, next to the address LEDs and above the write button circuit.
  3. Wire the 8 data lines from the DIP switch, connecting the side opposite to ground (the one going to the chips) directly below the address lines. Make sure they're separated by the gutter so they're not connected.
  4. Wire a line from the write button to your input area. You want to connect the side of the button that's not connected to ground (the one going to the chip).
So now you have one convenient spot with 8 address lines, 8 data lines, and a write line. If you want to get fancy, you can wire them into some kind of connector, but I found that ribbon jumper cables work nicely and keep things tidy.
The way we'll program the RAM is to enter program mode and set all the DIP switches to the high position (e.g., 11111111). Since the switches are upside-down, this means they'll all be disconnected and not driving to ground. The address and write lines will simply be floating and the data lines will be weakly pulled up by 1k resistors. Either way, the Arduino can now drive the signals going into the chips using its outputs.
Creating the Arduino Programmer
Now that we can interface with an Arduino, we need to write some software. If you follow Ben's 6502 video, you'll have all the knowledge you need to get this working. If you want some hints and code, see below (source code):
  1. Create arrays for your data and address lines. For example: const char ADDRESS_LINES[] = {39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53};. Create your write line with #define RAM_WRITE 3.
  2. Create functions to enable and disable your address and data lines. You want to enable them before writing. Make sure to disable them afterward so that you can still manually program using DIP switches without disconnecting the Arduino. The code looks like this (just change INPUT to OUTPUT accordingly): for(int n = 0; n < 8; n += 1) { pinMode(ADDRESS_LINES[n], OUTPUT); }
  3. Create a function to write to an address. It'll look like void writeData(byte writeAddress, byte writeData) and basically use two loops, one for address and one for data, followed by toggling the write.
  4. Create a char array that contains your program and data. You can use #define to create opcodes like #define LDA 0x01.
  5. In your main function, loop through the program array and send it through writeData.
With this setup, you can now load multi-line programs in a fraction of a second! This can really come in handy with debugging by stress testing your CPU with software. Make sure to test your setup with existing programs you know run reliably. Now that you have your basic setup working, you can add 8 additional lines to read the bus and expand the program to let you read memory locations or even monitor the running of your CPU.
Making an Assembler
The above will serve us well but it's missing a key feature: labels. Labels are invaluable in assembly because they're so versatile. Jumps, subroutines, variables all use labels. The problem is that labels require parsing. Parsing is a fun project on the road to a compiler but not something I wanted to delve into right now--if you're interested, you can learn about Flex and Bison. Instead, I found a custom assembler that lets you define your CPU's instruction set and it'll do everything else for you. Let's get it setup:
  1. If you're on Windows, you can use the pre-built binaries. Otherwise, you'll need to install Rust and compile via cargo build.
  2. Create a file called 8bit.cpu and define your CPU instructions (source code). For example, LDA would be lda {address} -> 0x01 @ address[7:0]. What's cool is you can also now create the instruction's immediate variant instead of having to call it LDI: lda #{value} -> 0x05 @ value[7:0].
  3. You can now write assembly by adding #include "8bit.cpu" to the top of your code. There's a lot of neat features so make sure to read the documentation!
  4. Once you've written some assembly, you can generate the machine code using ./customasm yourprogram.s -f hexc -p. This prints out a char array just like our Arduino program used!
  5. Copy the char array into your Arduino program and send it to your CPU.
At this stage, you can start creating some pretty complex programs with ease. I would definitely play around with writing some larger programs. I actually found a bug in my hardware that was hidden for a while because my programs were never very complex!

Step 2: Expand the Control Lines (Image)

Before we can expand the CPU any further, we have to address the fact we're running out of control lines. An easy way to do this is to add a 3rd 28C16 ROM and be on your way. If you want something a little more involved but satisfying, read on.
Right now the control lines are one hot encoded. This means that if you have 4 lines, you can encode 4 states. But we know that a 4-bit binary number can encode 16 states. We'll use this principle via 74LS138 decoders, just like Ben used for the step counter.
Choosing the Control Line Combinations
Everything comes with trade-offs. In the case of combining control lines, it means the two control lines we choose to combine can never be activated at the same time. We can ensure this by encoding all the inputs together in the first 74LS138 and all the outputs together in a second 74LS138. We'll keep the remaining control lines directly connected.
Rewiring the Control Lines
If your build is anything like mine, the control lines are a bit of a mess. You'll need to be careful when rewiring to ensure it all comes back together correctly. Let's get to it:
  1. Place the two 74LS138 decoders on the far right side of the breadboard with the ROMs. Connect them to power and ground.
  2. You'll likely run out of inverters, so place a 74LS04 on the breadboard above your decoders. Connect it to power and ground.
  3. Carefully take your inputs (MI, RI, II, AI, BI, J) and wire them to the outputs of the left 74LS138. Do not wire anything to O0 because that's activated by 000 which won't work for us!
  4. Carefully take your outputs (RO, CO, AO, EO) and wire them to the outputs of the right 74LS138. Remember, do not wire anything to O0!
  5. Now, the 74LS138 outputs are active low, but the ROM outputs were active high. This means you need to swap the wiring on all your existing 74LS04 inverters for the LEDs and control lines to work. Make sure you track which control lines are supposed to be active high vs. active low!
  6. Wire E3 to power and E2 to ground. Connect the E1 on both 138s together, then connect it to the same line as OE on your ROMs. This will ensure that the outputs are disabled when you're in program mode. You can actually take off the 1k pull-up resistors from the previous tutorial at this stage, because the 138s actively drive the lines going to the 74LS04 inverters rather than floating like the ROMs.
At this point, you really need to ensure that the massive rewiring job was successful. Connect 3 jumper wires to A0-A2 and test all the combinations manually. Make sure the correct LED lights up and check with a multimeteoscilloscope that you're getting the right signal at each chip. Catching mistakes at this point will save you a lot of headaches! Now that everything is working, let's finish up:
  1. Connect A0-A2 of the left 74LS138 to the left ROM's A0-A2.
  2. Connect A0-A2 of the right 74LS138 to the right ROM's A0-A2.
  3. Distribute the rest of the control signals across the two ROMs.
Changing the ROM Code
This part is easy. We just need to update all of our #define with the new addresses and program the ROMs again. For clarity that we're not using one-hot encoding anymore, I recommend using hex instead of binary. So instead of #define MI 0b0000000100000000, we can use #define MI 0x0100, #define RI 0x0200, and so on.
Testing
Expanding the control lines required physically rewiring a lot of critical stuff, so small mistakes can creep up and make mysterious errors down the road. Write a program that activates each control line at least once and make sure it works properly! With your assembler and Arduino programmer, this should be trivial.
Bonus: Adding B Register Output
With the additional control lines, don't forget you can now add a BO signal easily which lets you fully use the B register.

Step 3: Add a Stack (Image 1, Image 2)

Adding a stack significantly expands the capability of the CPU. It enables subroutines, recursion, and handling interrupts (with some additional logic). We'll create our stack with an 8-bit stack pointer hard-coded from $0100 to $01FF, just like the 6502.
Wiring up the Stack Pointer
A stack pointer is conceptually similar to a program counter. It stores an address, you can read it and write to it, and it increments. The only difference between a stack pointer and a program counter is that the stack pointer must also decrement. To create our stack pointer, we'll use two 74LS193 4-bit up/down binary counters:
  1. Place a 74LS00 NAND gate, 74LS245 transceiver, and two 74LS193 counters in a row next to your output register. Wire up power and ground.
  2. Wire the the Carry output of the right 193 to the Count Up input of the left 193. Do the same for the Borrow output and Count Down input.
  3. Connect the Clear input between the two 193s and with an active high reset line. The B register has one you can use on its 74LS173s.
  4. Connect the Load input between the two 193s and to a new active low control line called SI on your 74LS138 decoder.
  5. Connect the QA-QD outputs of the lower counter to A8-A5 and the upper counter to A4-A1. Pay special attention because the output are in a weird order (BACD) and you want to make sure the lower A is connected to A8 and the upper A is connected to A4.
  6. Connect the A-D inputs of the lower counter to B8-B5 and the upper counter to B4-B1. Again, the inputs are in a weird order and on both sides of the chip so pay special attention.
  7. Connect the B1-B8 outputs of the 74LS245 transceiver to the bus.
  8. On the 74LS245 transceiver, connect DIR to power (high) and connect OE to a new active low control line called SO on your 74LS138 decoder.
  9. Add 8 LEDs and resistors to the lower part of the 74LS245 transceiver (A1-A8) so you can see what's going on with the stack pointer.
Enabling Increment & Decrement
We've now connected everything but the Count Up and Count Down inputs. The way the 74LS193 works is that if nothing is counting, both inputs are high. If you want to increment, you keep Count Down high and pulse Count Up. To decrement, you do the opposite. We'll use a 74LS00 NAND gate for this:
  1. Take the clock from the 74LS08 AND gate and make it an input into two different NAND gates on the 74LS00.
  2. Take the output from one NAND gate and wire it to the Count Up input on the lower 74LS193 counter. Take the other output and wire it to the Count Down input.
  3. Wire up a new active high control line called SP from your ROM to the NAND gate going into Count Up.
  4. Wire up a new active high control line called SM from your ROM to the NAND gate going into Count Down.
At this point, everything should be working. Your counter should be able to reset, input a value, output a value, and increment/decrement. But the issue is it'll be writing to $0000 to $00FF in the RAM! Let's fix that.
Accessing Higher Memory Addresses
We need the stack to be in a different place in memory than our regular program. The problem is, we only have an 8-bit bus, so how do we tell the RAM we want a higher address? We'll use a special control line to do this:
  1. Wire up an active high line called SA from the 28C16 ROM to A8 on the Cypress CY7C199 RAM.
  2. Add an LED and resistor so you can see when the stack is active.
That's it! Now, whenever we need the stack we can use a combination of the control line and stack pointer to access $0100 to $01FF.
Updating the Instruction Set
All that's left now is to create some instructions that utilize the stack. We'll need to settle some conventions before we begin:
If you want to add a little personal flair to your design, you can change the convention fairly easily. Let's implement push and pop (source code):
  1. Define all your new control lines, such as #define SI 0x0700 and #define SO 0x0005.
  2. Create two new instructions: PSH (1011) and POP (1100).
  3. PSH starts the same as any other for the first two steps: MI|CO and RO|II|CE. The next step is to put the contents of the stack pointer into the address register via MI|SO|SA. Recall that SA is the special control line that tells the memory to access the $01XX bank rather than $00XX.
  4. We then take the contents of AO and write it into the RAM. We can also increment the stack pointer at this stage. All of this is done via: AO|RI|SP|SA, followed by TR.
  5. POP is pretty similar. Start off with MI|CO and RO|II|CE. We then need to take a cycle and decrement the stack pointer with SM. Like with PSH, we then set the address register with MI|SO|SA.
  6. We now just need to output the RAM into our A register with RO|AI|SA and then end the instruction with TR.
  7. Updating the assembler is easy since neither instruction has operands. For example, push is just psh -> 0x0B.
And that's it! Write some programs that take advantage of your new 256 byte stack to make sure everything works as expected.

Step 4: Add Subroutine Instructions (Image)

The last step to complete our stack is to add subroutine instructions. This allows us to write complex programs and paves the way for things like interrupt handling.
Subroutines are like a blend of push/pop instructions and a jump. Basically, when you want to call a subroutine, you save your spot in the program by pushing the program counter onto the stack, then jumping to the subroutine's location in memory. When you're done with the subroutine, you simply pop the program counter value from the stack and jump back into it.
We'll follow 6502 conventions and only save and restore the program counter for subroutines. Other CPUs may choose to save more state, but it's generally left up to the programmer to ensure they're not wiping out states in their subroutines (e.g., push the A register at the start of your subroutine if you're messing with it and restore it before you leave).
Adding an Extra Opcode Line
I've started running low on opcodes at this point. Luckily, we still have two free address lines we can use. To enable 5-bit opcodes, simply wire up the 4Q output of your upper 74LS173 register to A7 of your 28C16 ROM (this assumes your opcodes are at A3-A6).
Updating the ROM Writer
At this point, you simply need to update the Arduino writer to support 32 instructions vs. the current 16. So, for example, UCODE_TEMPLATE[16][8] becomes UCODE_TEMPLATE[32][8] and you fill in the 16 new array elements with nop. The problem is that the Arduino only has so much memory and with the way Ben's code is written to support conditional jumps, it starts to get tight.
I bet the code can be re-written to handle this, but I had a TL866II Plus EEPROM programmer handy from the 6502 build and I felt it would be easier to start using that instead. Converting to a regular C program is really simple (source code):
  1. Copy all the #define, global const arrays (don't forget to expand them from 16 to 32), and void initUCode(). Add #include and #include to the top.
  2. In your traditional int main (void) C function, after initializing with initUCode(), make two arrays: char ucode_upper[2048] and char ucode_lower[2048].
  3. Take your existing loop code that loops through all addresses: for (int address = 0; address < 2048; address++).
  4. Modify instruction to be 5-bit with int instruction = (address & 0b00011111000) >> 3;.
  5. When writing, just write to the arrays like so: ucode_lower[address] = ucode[flags][instruction][step]; and ucode_upper[address] = ucode[flags][instruction][step] >> 8;.
  6. Open a new file with FILE *f = fopen("rom_upper.hex", "wb");, write to it with fwrite(ucode_upper, sizeof(char), sizeof(ucode_upper), f); and close it with fclose(f);. Repeat this with the lower ROM too.
  7. Compile your code using gcc (you can use any C compiler), like so: gcc -Wall makerom.c -o makerom.
Running your program will spit out two binary files with the full contents of each ROM. Writing the file via the TL866II Plus requires minipro and the following command: minipro -p CAT28C16A -w rom_upper.hex.
Adding Subroutine Instructions
At this point, I cleaned up my instruction set layout a bit. I made psh and pop 1000 and 1001, respectively. I then created two new instructions: jsr and rts. These allow us to jump to a subroutine and returns from a subroutine. They're relatively simple:
  1. For jsr, the first three steps are the same as psh: MI|CO, RO|II|CE, MI|SO|SA.
  2. On the next step, instead of AO we use CO to save the program counter to the stack: CO|RI|SP|SA.
  3. We then essentially read the 2nd byte to do a jump and terminate: MI|CO, RO|J.
  4. For rts, the first four steps are the same as pop: MI|CO, RO|II|CE, SM, MI|SO|SA.
  5. On the next step, instead of AI we use J to load the program counter with the contents in stack: RO|J|SA.
  6. We're not done! If we just left this as-is, we'd jump to the 2nd byte of jsr which is not an opcode, but a memory address. All hell would break loose! We need to add a CE step to increment the program counter and then terminate.
Once you update the ROM, you should have fully functioning subroutines with 5-bit opcodes. One great way to test them is to create a recursive program to calculate something--just don't go too deep or you'll end up with a stack overflow!

Conclusion

And that's it! Another successful upgrade of your 8-bit CPU. You now have a very capable machine and toolchain. At this point I would have a bunch of fun with the software aspects. In terms of hardware, there's a number of ways to go from here:
  1. Interrupts. Interrupts are just special subroutines triggered by an external line. You can make one similar to how Ben did conditional jumps. The only added complexity is the need to load/save the flags register since an interrupt can happen at any time and you don't want to destroy the state. Given this would take more than 8 steps, you'd also need to add another line for the step counter (see below).
  2. ROM expansion. At this point, address lines on the ROM are getting tight which limits any expansion possibilities. With the new approach to ROM programming, it's trivial to switch out the 28C16 for the 28C256 that Ben uses in the 6502. These give you 4 additional address lines for flags/interrupts, opcodes, and steps.
  3. LCD output. At this point, adding a 16x2 character LCD like Ben uses in the 6502 is very possible.
  4. Segment/bank register. It's essentially a 2nd memory address register that lets you access 256-byte segments/banks of RAM using bank switching. This lets you take full advantage of the 32K of RAM in the Cypress chip.
  5. Fast increment instructions. Add these to registers by replacing 74LS173s with 74LS193s, allowing you to more quickly increment without going through the ALU. This is used to speed up loops and array operations.
submitted by MironV to beneater [link] [comments]

How To Install And Run Borderlands 2 On Linux – Proton ⁄ Fixed Marcus Introduction & Cinematics

Hi everyone.
I've recently produced a video on how I got Borderlands 2 to work through Proton, check it out below and let me know what you think.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StPRBwPZE_c&feature=youtu.be
More specifically it covers how actually launch the game and fix the Marcus introduction cinematic so that it plays correctly and does not crash the game.
Alternatively for people who prefer a written guide see below:
STEP 1 – INSTALL THE GAME AND FORCE THE GAME TO LOAD WITH PROTON
Right click on the Properties of the game, tick the Force the use of a specific Steam Play compatibility tool option, click OK, and then install the game as normal.
STEP 2 – RENAME THE BORDERLANDS 2.EXE TO LAUNCHER.EXE
Right click on the game, go to Properties, LOCAL FILES, BROWSE LOCAL FILES, and in the window that appears click on the Binaries folder, and from there click on Win32.
Inside that folder rename Launcher.exe to Launcher.exe.old and Borderlands2.exe to Launcher.exe.
You will now be able to launch the game, and manually set your graphical options, so do that and exit the game once done.
STEP 3 – FIX THE CINEMATICS AND CUTSCENE VIDEOS
Download the first Media Foundation Wine Workaround script at: https://github.com/z0z0z/mf-install
Click on the green Code button, choose the Download ZIP option, extract the downloaded archive and open up a Terminal window in that folder.
In the Terminal window you want to type something similar to the following referencing where the game is installed on your system, which in my case is:
WINEPREFIX="/home/ryanj/.local/share/Steam/steamapps/compatdata/49520/pfx" ./mf-install.sh
Once done, download the second Media Foundation Wine Workaround script which can be found at: https://github.com/z0z0z/mf-installcab
Once again, click on the green Code button, choose the Download ZIP option, extract the downloaded archive and open up a Terminal window in that folder.
In the Terminal window you want to type something similar to the following referencing where the game is installed on your system, which in my case is:
WINEPREFIX="/home/ryanj/.local/share/Steam/steamapps/compatdata/49520/pfx" ./install-mf-32.sh
All you need to do at this point is copy the mfplat.dll to the game’s application folder.
The easiest method for doing that is to open up Steam, right click on the game, click on Properties, LOCAL FILES, BROWSE LOCAL FILES, and paste the dll in the window that appears.
STEP 4 – ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE TWEAKS
Add the following to the game's custom launcher options: __GL_THREADED_OPTIMIZATIONS=1 PROTON_USE_D9VK=1 %command%
After all this is done, the game should function the same as running it on Windows.
If you found this helpful, please consider checking out all the other content on my channel and subscribing to support me.
Many Thanks
Ryan
submitted by Intelligent-Gaming to SteamPlay [link] [comments]

MAME 0.220

[ Removed by reddit in response to a copyright notice. ]
submitted by cuavas to emulation [link] [comments]

Working OpenCore Hackintosh AMD Ryzen 2600, GigBy B450m, 16 (2*8gb), RX 590 on macOS 10.15.4 Catalina! Dual Boot with Windows 10

Working OpenCore Hackintosh AMD Ryzen 2600, GigBy B450m, 16 (2*8gb), RX 590 on macOS 10.15.4 Catalina! Dual Boot with Windows 10

Working system on macOS 10.15.4
rEFInd bootloader.
Working iServices. Logged in into iCloud and things like iMessage and FaceTime work!

I used the AMD Vanilla guide with OpenCore, looking to https://khronokernel-2.gitbook.io/opencore-vanilla-desktop-guide/ and created a bootable USB and configure the config.plist for the EFI
Hardware and What's Working:
  • AMD Ryzen 5 2600, Gigabyte B450m, Corsair 16 gigs ram, Gigabyte RX 590
  • OpenCore, Dual boot with Windows 10 and macOS Catalina (10.15.4)
  • Realtek ethernet
  • USB ports mapped
  • Graphics via WhateverGreen
  • Realtek onboard headphones and lineout with AppleALC.
  • iMessage, iCloud, FaceTime, AppStore etc..
  • Bluetooth
  • Temperatures for my CPU and GPU etc and fan speeds.
What's not working:
To be honest, everything works like it should be. I did not experience weird bugs or glitches.
  • About my mac page says Intel i5 instead of my AMD CPU
  • Zooming in Adobe XD has lagg
  • RAM speeds are not the same as what is showing up in about my mac.

Issues I had:
My EFI partition was glitching, I don't know exactly how. But a long time ago I replaced my old SSD for Windows with an m.2 SSD. With a tool I copied the whole Windows OS from my SSD to the m.2 SSD. I guess my EFI partition was glichting due this, but I never felt any issues with it on Windows itself.
When I tried to install rEFInd, command prompt in Windows (for manual installation) was a pain, it gave errors, blah blah blah. After 4 days I deleted my whole EFI partition and created a new one with a bootable USB Windows installer. In the Windows Setup I pressed SHIFT+10 for the command prompt and made a new EFI partition. When that was fixed I could install rEFInd, it finally did show up in my BIOS! (If you need help with this please PM me on here or discord: 𝗠𝗶𝘁𝗰𝗵𝗲𝗹#7899*)*

Note: For editing the EFI partition on Windows you need to mount your EFI partition in CMD with admin rights. "mountvol S: /s" - Then I could access the volume with Explorer++ (also runned as admin)

  • iServices did not work, including iMessage and FaceTime
I had a problem in the beginning where it would hang on the 2FA verification for my Apple ID

Can't login into iCloud, hangs at 2FA
So I tried fixing my En0 with this guide: https://khronokernel-2.gitbook.io/opencore-vanilla-desktop-guide/post-install/post-install/iservices
When that was done it was still hanging. But iMessage and FaceTime worked after that. When I tried logging in via the AppStore it worked. So then I was logged in into the whole system.

Note: I did not tell all my problems here because it can be different on some other hackintosh pc's, like I needed to generate a custom serial code for my system with GenSMBIOS and configure it with ProperTree in my config.plist which was in my EFI partition for booting up my system.

  • "The disk you inserted was not readable by this computer."
It was not a glitch or anything but because I have a dual boot system it gave me constantly this error when booting into macOS

https://preview.redd.it/5fdvclbtz6q41.png?width=552&format=png&auto=webp&s=925b45445b14566cb9210ea0515507dc3cbba3ec
This is my Windows SSD which was mounting constantly on booting macOS, so I tried to disable mounting that disk on booting, which did not work for me. So I installed the kext DiskArbitrationFixup to disable this warning. But I am just ignoring the disk in my Finder and I can't delete files on it from macOS which is really good.

After all I was happy for me as a 17 years old (not native English speaker from The Netherlands) that my system worked perfectly (for how I liked it). It took me full one week time for this, but I guess my system it worth it :)

PS: That background, I made it myself a while ago as a redesign for Starbucks lol :)


Edit 1: My custom rEFInd GUI icons for Windows 10 and Shutdown (they were not updated for more than 4 years)
For those who wants my custom Windows 10 (and the maybe ugly shutdown icon for the rEFInd bootloader) here's the download link: https://mega.nz/#!bSBQjKZA!NpO_9CefMsiMRcClAix4D11sEPtRaK8mnJ7-Fic6aE4

My Cutom Windows 10 icon (and shutdown)

Edit 2: How to install rEFInd and apply a theme
I did not get rEFInd install via macOS.. I tried it serval times but it did not show up at all in my BIOS. I guess it was just a stupid thing in my Windows partition because I had issues with my EFI partition like I said earlier. So this tutorial is for dual boot users (with Windows). I will try to explain how you can also do this on macOS, I guess that will also work but it did not for me due the partition.

  1. So when you're in Windows, google for rEFInd download, and download it from the SourceForge website.
  2. Locate Command Prompt in the Start menu, right-click it, and select Run as Administrator. This action opens a Command Prompt window with administrative privileges.
  3. Type mountvol S: /S in the Administrator Command Prompt window. This makes the ESP/EFI accessible as drive S: from that window. (You can use a drive identifier other than S: if you like.)
  4. Change into the main rEFInd package directory (you do this with in command promt with "CD " <(without the ""), so that the refind subdirectory is visible when you type dir.
  5. Type xcopy /E refind S:\EFI\refind\ to copy the refind directory tree to the ESP's EFI directory. If you omit the trailing backslash from this command, xcopy will ask if you want to create the refind directory. Tell it to do so.
  6. Type S: to change to the ESP.
  7. Type cd EFI\refind to change into the refind subdirectory
  8. You may want to selectively delete some of the drivers in the drivers_x64, drivers_ia32, or drivers_aa64 directory, depending on your architecture and needs. Unnecessary drivers will slow the rEFInd start process, and can even cause the drivers you need to not work or cause a system crash.
  9. Type rename refind.conf-sample refind.conf to rename rEFInd's configuration file.
  10. Type bcdedit /set "{bootmgr}" path \EFI\refind\refind_x64.efi to set rEFInd as the default EFI boot program. Note that "{bootmgr}" is entered as such, including both the quotes and braces ({}). Also, change refind_x64.efi to refind_ia32.efi on systems with 32-bit EFIs. Such computers are rare, and most of them are tablets. Check your Windows bit depth to determine which binary you should use.
  11. If you like, type bcdedit /set "{bootmgr}" description "rEFInd description" to set a description (change rEFInd description as you see fit).
At this point, when you reboot, rEFInd should appear as your new default boot program. Or check your BIOS if it is there in your boot options. If it doesn't work for you, please go and search on the internet further because on the is so much more information on the official rEFInd site.

So if it works, you will see a ugly grey theme with the boot options.
I am using this theme: https://github.com/andersfischernielsen/rEFInd-minimal-black
  1. Locate your refind EFI directory. This is commonly /boot/EFI/refind though it will depend on where you mount your ESP and where rEFInd is installed.
  2. Create a folder called themes inside it, if it doesn't already exist
  3. Clone the theme into the themes folder you just created
  4. To enable the theme add include themes/rEFInd-minimal-black/theme.conf at the end of refind.conf.
You can edit the .conf files with Notepad++ on Windows and TextEdit on macOS
If you want to use my icons for a better Windows icon (and shutdown icon) replace my icons with the icons in /boot/EFI/refind/themes/rEFInd-minimal-black/icons folder.

!! TO MOUNT YOUR EFI PARTITION USE EXPLORER++ ON WINDOWS AND CLOVER ON YOUR HACKINTOSH !!

For those who want to do this on macOS, I'll copy the original instructions so it is clearer for you than for myself. But it's about the same with installing the theme. The only thing you need to do is mounting your EFI with clover. The tutorial:
  1. Open a Terminal window in which you'll type the following commands.
  2. If you want to install rEFInd on your ESP, you must first mount it. The easy way to do this is to use the mountesp script that comes with rEFInd. When you run it, the script should tell you where the ESP was mounted. You can do the job manually by typing mkdir /Volumes/ESP followed by sudo mount -t msdos /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/ESP. Note that you may need to change /dev/disk0s1 to something else if your ESP is at an unusual location. Type diskutil list or use a tool such as my GPT fdisk (gdisk) to examine your partition table to find your ESP if necessary.
  3. Type sudo mkdir -p /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind to create a suitable directory for rEFInd. If you want to place rEFInd on the macOS root partition, you should adjust the pathname appropriately, as in /efi/refind. Alternatively, you can use the Finder to create the directory.
  4. Copy the files in the refind subdirectory of the rEFInd binary package to the like-named directory you've just created. You can do this in the Finder or by typing sudo cp -r refind/* /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/ in your Terminal window after changing into the rEFInd package's main directory.
  5. Remove the files for the versions of rEFInd you're not using, as in sudo rm Volumes/esp/efi/refind/refind_ia32.efi Volumes/esp/efi/refind/refind_aa64.efi on a Mac with a 64-bit EFI or sudo rm /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/refind_x64.efi Volumes/esp/efi/refind/refind_aa64.efi on a Mac with a 32-bit EFI.
  6. Optionally, remove the drivers directories for the architectures you're not using—/Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/drivers_ia32 or /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/drivers_x64, as appropriate. (No Mac uses an ARM CPU, so you'd also remove /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/drivers_aa64.
  7. I strongly recommend that you remove some or all of the drivers for the architecture you are using; if you don't need them, they'll slow down the start process and can even hang rEFInd if a driver is buggy and it encounters a damaged filesystem. See the page on drivers for more on this topic. Note that Apple's firmware includes its own HFS+ driver, so the HFS+ driver provided with rEFInd is useless on Macs. Normally, you only need a filesystem driver if you're dual-booting with Linux, and in that case you need only the driver for the filesystem that holds the Linux kernel.
  8. If this is your first installation, type sudo mv /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/refind.conf-sample /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/refind.conf (adjusting the path as necessary) to rename the sample configuration file so that it will serve as a real configuration file. (Again, you can do this with the Finder, if you prefer.)
  9. "Bless" rEFInd by typing one of the following two commands:
  • If you're installing rEFInd on the ESP, type sudo bless --mount /Volumes/ESP --setBoot --file /Volumes/ESP/efi/refind/refind_x64.efi --shortform, adjusting the mount point and exact path to the file as appropriate for your installation.
  • If you're installing rEFInd to an ordinary HFS+ volume, type sudo bless --setBoot --folder /efi/refind --file /efi/refind/refind_x64.efi. (Adjust the path and filename as necessary if you're placing rEFInd somewhere else or using the 32-bit version.)
  • This is the step that's likely to fail if your system is booted with SIP active.
  1. If you don't want to reboot immediately after installing rEFInd, you may optionally unmount the ESP by typing sudo umount /dev/disk0s1 or sudo umount /Volumes/ESP. This step isn't strictly required, but if you want to keep the ESP out of your directory tree, it can be useful.
When you reboot, your Mac should bring up the rEFInd menu, and should continue to do so thereafter. If you make changes that break this association, you can re-run the bless command (if necessary, restoring the rEFInd files first). This might be necessary after installing system updates from Apple or if you upgrade rEFInd to a newer version.
If you're replacing rEFIt, you may discover that rEFInd works on the first boot, but the system reverts back to rEFIt or a direct boot to macOS on the second boot. To fix this problem, you can remove the rEFItBlesser program, which is located at /Library/StartupItems/rEFItBlesser. This program attempts to keep rEFIt set as the default boot loader, but it also has the purpose of protecting the computer from launching the wrong OS after waking from sleep. If you want that protection, my suggestion is to install rEFIt and rEFItBlesser and then replace the refit.efi file with refind_x64.efi or refind_ia32.efi (renaming it to refit.efi). Used in this way, rEFInd will still look for its own configuration file, refind.conf, so you'll need to move it but not rename it. If you don't move the icons from the rEFInd package, your icons will continue to look like rEFIt icons, and you'll be missing the new icons for specific Linux distributions that rEFInd provides. One final caveat: It's conceivable that rEFItBlesser is what's causing filesystem corruption for some users, so if you've been having this problem with rEFIt, it might be worth disabling this program and not using it with rEFInd.

I dont know why but I made a quick TikTok haha

https://reddit.com/link/fsy48b/video/gpm5han3a9q41/player


submitted by Mitchhhel to hackintosh [link] [comments]

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